Bulletin, Issue 48

Front Cover
The Survey, 1916 - Geology
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Page 2 - The name used for a soil series usually indicates the locality where that particular series was first recognized and mapped by the Soil Survey. By uniting the name of the soil...
Page 65 - The local distribution of rainfall varies, however, from year to year, some sections receiving more rain one year, and other sections more in other years. The variation is caused largely by the movement of cyclonic storms. The average rainfall for the entire state during the driest year was 21.4 inches, and for the wettest year 37 inches. "Of equal importance, in agriculture, to the total rainfall, is its seasonal distribution, and in this respect Wisconsin is unusually fortunate, since about half...
Page 50 - Plowing fields in narrow strips with dead furrows from 2 to 4 rods apart, and having these lead into open ditches along the side of the field will greatly assist in carrying off the surface water. In order to make the internal drainage of the soil complete, however, tile drains should be used to supplement the surface drains. From tests made by tile draining such land it has been found that the increased crops will pay for the improvement in the course of a few years. When the drainage of these soils...
Page 66 - Another phase of rainfall distribution of great importance is its variation within a period of a few weeks. Frequently periods of drought and periods of unusually heavy rainfall occur, continuing for one to four weeks and occasionally longer. Observations taken at Madison...
Page 10 - ... includes dark-colored soils occupying low, poorly drained depressions, marshes, and old lake beds. They contain a high percentage of organic matter, but much more mineral matter than Peat (with included areas of Muck). The types recognized as belonging to this series are Clyde silty clay loam, loam, and sandy loam. The material mapped as Peat (with included areas of Muck) occupies swamps, marshes, and old lake beds. Where the vegetable matter has reached an advanced stage of decomposition, and...
Page 24 - ... more, depending upon the degree of acidity. The limestone may be applied at any convenient time as it is slowly soluble and will remain in the soil for a number of years. Another factor of importance to be considered in the permanent improvement of these soils is that of thorough cultivation. Plowing should be done when the moisture...
Page 32 - Hinckley coarse sandy loam is low, probably averaging not more than $8 to $15 an acre. The following table gives the results of mechanical analyses of samples of the soil and subsoil of this type: Mechanical analyses of...
Page 38 - There is practically no lime carbonate in. the soil to a depth of 3 feet, except that which is in the form of coarse sand and gravel, and hence of relatively little influence in preventing the development of acidity in the soil. It is evident, therefore, that the maintenance of any considerable degree of fertility in these two types of soil will require the use of methods for increasing the nitrogen and organic matter...

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