Algeria: The Topography and History, Political, Social, and Natural, of French Africa

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N. Cooke, 1854 - Algeria - 490 pages
 

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Page 317 - And he took butter, and milk, and the calf which he had dressed, and set it before them; and he stood by them under the tree, and they did eat.
Page 317 - His substance also was seven thousand sheep, and three thousand camels, and five hundred yoke of oxen, and five hundred she-asses, and a very great household; so that this man was the greatest of all the children of the east.
Page 317 - And the Lord hath blessed my master greatly; and he is become great: and he hath given him flocks and herds, and silver, and gold, and menservants, and maidservants, and camels, and asses.
Page 441 - The fire was kept well up throughout the night; and when the day had fully dawned, the then expiring embers were kicked aside, and as soon as a sufficient time had elapsed to render the air of the silent cave breathable, some soldiers were directed to ascertain how matters were within. They were gone but a few minutes, and they came back, we are told, pale, trembling, terrified, hardly daring, it seemed, to confront the light of day. No wonder they trembled and looked pale. They had found all the...
Page 315 - I tell you, in that night there shall be two men in one bed ; the one shall be taken, and the other shall be left. 35 Two women shall be grinding together; the one shall be taken, and the other left.
Page 441 - ... order, an immense fire was kindled at the mouth* of the cave, and fed sedulously during the summer night with wood, grass, reeds, anything that would help to keep up the volume of smoke and flame which the wind drove in roaring, whirling eddies into the mouth of the cavern. It was too late now for the unfortunate Arabs to offer to surrender. The discharge of a cannon would not have been heard in the roar of that hug-e blastfurnace, much less smoke-strangled cries of human agony. The fire was...
Page 26 - Ill-fated Carthage ! scarce, amidst the plains, A trace of all her ruin'd pomp remains! Proud cities vanish, states and realms decay. The world's unstable glories fade away ! Yet mortals dare of certain fate complain : O impious folly of presuming man...
Page 459 - ... serai wall, exists an old-looking mandir ; as it stands, the mandir is an odd construction, apparently of various periods, and fragments of sculpture, resembling those at the Kutb, are inserted in the walls. Tradition ascribes the mandir to Shah Jehan's reign, which is probably correct ; but it must have been built on the site, and with the materials, of a much older temple. Chowmhan possesses a battlemented wall and gates in a ruinous condition. The Man mandir of Brindaban is a building, the...
Page 466 - The mighty impulse given to commerce by the discovery of America and of the passage to the East Indies by the Cape of Good Hope...
Page 215 - Bastion, where there is a small creek, and the ruins of a fort, that give occasion to the name. The factory of the French African company had formerly their settlement at this place ; but the unwholesomeness of the situation, occasioned by the neighbouring ponds and marshes, obliged them to remove to La Calle, another inlet, three leagues farther to the east, where those gentlemen have a magnificent house and garden, 900 coraJ fishers, a company of soldiers, several nieces of ordnance, and a place...

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