Spanish America: Or A Descriptive, Historical, and Geographical Account of the Dominions of Spain in the Western Hemisphere, Continental and Insular; Illustrated by a Map of Spanish North America, and the West-India Islands; a Map of Spanish South America, and an Engraving, Representing the Comparative Altitudes of the Mountains in Those Regions, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818 - Latin America
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Page 172 - Hualca, an Indian peasant, when pursuing wild goats. Arriving at a steep place he laid hold of a small shrub to prevent himself from falling ; but the shrub, being unable to support his weight, was torn up by the roots, and disclosed to...
Page 32 - In this the adults of each sex work one hour in the morning, and one in the evening. In the missions nearest the coast, the garden of the community is generally a sugar or indigo plantation, under the direction of the missionary; and the produce of which, were the law strictly observed, can be employed only for the support of the church, and the purchase of the sacerdotal ornaments. The great square...
Page 14 - When the Spaniards first landed in this country, they observed several villages built in the lake, which is the mode adopted by the Indians at present, considering this plan as the healthiest. The appearance of one of these little towns amid the waters, caused the Spanish adventurers to name it Little Venice, or Venezuela, which title was afterwards transferred to
Page 31 - American fig-tree* nourishes, we should cover a vast extent of ground. By this singular assemblage, the forests, as well as the flanks of the rocks and mountains, enlarge the domains of organic nature. The same * Ficus gigutea. 36 lianas as creep on the ground, reach the tops of the trees, and pass from one to another at the height of more than a hundred feet.
Page 103 - Their habitations are miserable hovels, destitute of every convenience or accommodation, and disgustingly filthy. Their dress is poor and mean, and their food coarse and scanty. Their religion is still tainted with the superstition of their forefathers, but they are great observers of the external rites and ceremonies of the Church, and spend large sums of money in masses and processions : a species of profusion...
Page 9 - On the banks of the Orinoco the magnificence of the scenery is beyond description. Forests of the greatest extent are filled with aromatic trees, which diffuse the most delightful odor; birds of the most various and beautiful plumage abound, and hordes of monkeys follow the astonished traveller. Passing these forests, enormous plains extend their verdant surfaces...
Page 110 - Americans, his arrival in his kingdom, ordering them to lay down their arms, and promising promising oblivion of the past; to enforce this mandate, he also sent General Morillo from Cadiz with a well equipped army of .' 10,000 men. This army landed on the coast of Caraccas in April, 1815; but the insurgents not paying attention to his Majesty's commands, the general immediately commenced active measures. From Campano, where he landed, he proceeded to Margarita, from thence to Caraccas, and in the...
Page 207 - Spaniards, though it is occasionally traversed by both ; in these trackless deserts, there are no land-marks or traces by which the road can be discovered, for many hundred miles : the route, therefore, is pursued by the compass. From Buenos Ayres, the great road to Potosi and Lima passes through Tucuman. In 1748, regular stages were built all the way, post-houses were erected, and relays of horses and carriages provided. The method of travelling is in covered waggons, drawn by .oxen or horses. In...
Page 43 - During this period, the plains nearest the rivers are converted into lakes of immense extent. The LAKES, properly so called, of Venezuela are not numerous, for we can hardly give that appellation to the sheets of water produced by the periodical swell of the Orinoco, or by the rains, and which are generally without any depth. The Lake of Valencia has been already described. The RIVERS of Venezuela are more numerous than in any other part of Spanish America. Every valley has its stream ; and though...

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