The English Dance of Death, from the Designs of Thomas Rowlandson, Volume 2

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Methuen and Company, 1903 - Dance of Death
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Page 232 - ... Pierce into all obscurities, And thus unveil them once again For modern Learning to explain. These Sages are oft known to grope Upon a rugged Mountain's top, And dig among the caverns deep, Where wrecks of former ages sleep ; While from the Castle's crumbling towers, Or Gothic Abbey's ivied bowers, They cull, for the historic page, The truths of many a doubtful Age. Thus are their useful Labours shewn, New Lights on darkling times are thrown, And Knowledge added to our own. — But sometimes...
Page 31 - Th' unnatural mother, when she tears From her full paps the Child she bears ? While thus to chance the bantling 's hurl'd, She gives her fondness to the world ; And, as she haunts where Pleasure reigns, Forgets she felt a Mother's pains. — Haste, haste, Dorinda, from the throng, Quit the gay dance and warbling song ; You 're call'd, with pale and trembling mien, To view a sad, heart-rending scene : — Haste to thy Infant, and prepare To view the Horrors of thy Care : The foster-mother feels no...
Page 202 - REDESDALE'S patient, patriot care, He now no longer need despair ; No longer writhe beneath the Paw Of griping Harpies of the Law : But in the Prison's transient gloom, May look for better times to come. REDESDALE, in thy great work, proceed ! Freedom will hail thee for the deed, And doubt not, but each future age Will bless the Patriot and the Sage. But e'er the bold, correcting hand Of Justice did, with mild command, Sweep from the Law the petty powers That curtail'd Freedom's rightful hours, And...
Page 186 - ... as well, The Attornies never go to Hell ; As by the simple meaning given, That these same folks ne'er go to Heaven, But yet, perhaps, without pretence, To more than common, mother sense, We may the knotty point determine As well as Judges clad in ermine. Let us suppose that Power supreme, Where-ever placed, should form a scheme That, if in Equity or Law, A Suit by any Trick or Flaw, By any counterfeit contrivance, Of crafty plea, or sly connivance, Should last beyond four Terms, at most, Th'...
Page 117 - Phoebus might be seen Or in the Cirque or on the Green, While rival Venuses display'd Their Beauties, dancing in the shade. Our Native Artist whose acclaim Will last while ART can give a Name, To strike by contrast, boldly placed Near the Greek Form, a figure graced With all the cumbrous folds of Plaster, In shape of modern Dancing Master ; Nor could the purest power of Art, With a more height'ning force impart The difference 'tween the Grace that's caught, By fine examples daily taught, Which ev'ry...
Page 187 - Now, when this question were afloat, How, say you, would the ATTORNIES vote ? Would they, like honest men and true, Keep right and Justice in their view, Or think 'twould hurt the Revenue : And, therefore, for th' Exchequer's sake, They must th
Page 181 - ... by working strife, And fatten on the Ills of Life, Whether 'tis Shakespeare, or Moliere, Johnson or Congreve, or Voltaire, Whatever Country's comic Stage Does the dramatic mind engage, Th' Attorney with degraded mien Appears to turpify the scene. Law in itself is just and good When it is practised as it should, And Lawgivers can ne'er intend What Justice never can defend. It therefore, very strange appears, That Clients should, for twenty years, With all appliances to boot, Be wading through...
Page 30 - ... the channels dry ; And let the new-born babe be thrown Upon a bosom not her own ? 'Tis even so : such Mothers live Who to their Infants do not give The Milk that Nature's self prepares ; Whose stream their children claim as Heirs, And Heaven's all-sacred Laws ordain The new-born Cherub to sustain. Yes, there are Mothers — yes, who dare, Soon as it breathes the vital air, While it unfolds its opening charms, To yield it to a stranger's arms ; And let the helpless babe be press'd, Unconscious...
Page 260 - ... Death claims you as his destin'd Bride 58. p. 199. " The End of Life " the Chairman cries 'Tis drank — and many a Toper dies 59. p. 204. The carefull, and the careless led To join the Living and the Dead 60. p. 210. The Serjeant's Tongue will cease to brawl In ev'ry Court of yonder Hall 61. p. 222. All Fates he vow'd to him were known, And yet he could not tell his own 62. p. 230. To trust to Fortune's Smiles alone Is the High Road to be undone 63. p. 236. Death, without either Bribe or Fee...

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