A Complete Handbook for the Sanitary Troops of the U. S. Army and Navy, and National Guard and Naval Militia

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Page 259 - A ration is the allowance for the subsistence of one person for one day. The garrison ration is intended for troops in garrison, and, in time of peace, for troops in maneuver camps...
Page 14 - The personnel protected in virtue of the first paragraph of article 9, and articles 10 and 11, will wear attached to the left arm a brassard bearing a red cross on a white ground, which will be issued and stamped by competent military authority, and accompanied by a certificate of identity in the case of persons attached to the sanitary service of armies who do not have military uniform.
Page 127 - Appears Dead. I. IMMEDIATELY BREAK THE CIRCUIT. With a single quick motion, free the victim from the current. Use any dry non-conductor 'clothing, rope, board) to move either the victim or the wire. Beware of using metal or any moist material. While freeing the victim from the live conductor have every effort also made to shut off the current quickly.
Page 132 - ... 6. Continue artificial respiration without interruption until natural breathing is restored, if necessary, four hours or longer, or until a physician declares the patient is dead. 7. As soon as this artificial respiration has been started and while it is being continued, an assistant should loosen any tight clothing about the patient's neck, chest or waist.
Page 352 - Men should not lie on damp ground. In temporary camps and in bivouac they raise their beds if suitable material, such as straw, leaves, or boughs can be obtained, or use their ponchos or slickers. In cold weather and when fuel is plentiful the ground may be warmed by fires, the men making their beds after raking away the ashes.
Page 351 - Latrines for the men are always located on the opposite side of the camp from the kitchens, generally one for each company unit and one for the officers of a battalion or squadron. They are so placed that the drainage or overflow can not pollute the water supply or camp grounds. When the camp is for one night only, straddle trenches suffice. In camp of longer duration, and when it is not possible to provide latrine boxes, as for permanent camps, deeper trenches should be dug.
Page 354 - Light woolen underclothing should be worn, and when a soldier's clothing or bedding becomes damp from exposure to rain or heavy dews the first opportunity should be taken to dry it in the sun or by fires.
Page 393 - Take the currycomb in the right hand, fingers over back of comb ; begin on the near side at the upper part of the neck, thence proceed to the chest, arms, shoulders, back, belly, flank, loins, and croup in the order named.
Page 450 - ... bottle grasped near the bottom, held in an upright position, and the stream permitted to flow into the" bottle until it is filled to the shoulder. The stopper should then be replaced; both it and the cloth should be secured by carrying the wire several times around the neck of the bottle and twisting the ends tight. The stopper must be handled only by the square cloth-covered top. The lip of the bottle must not be brought in contact with the faucet or spout, nor should the neck of the bottle...
Page 351 - ... the kitchens, generally one for each company unit and one for the officers of a battalion or squadron. They are so placed that the drainage or overflow can not pollute the water supply or camp grounds. When the camp is for one night only, straddle trenches suffice. In camp of longer duration, and when it is not possible to provide latrine boxes, as for permanent camps, deeper trenches should be dug. These may be used as straddle trenches or a seat improvised. When open trenches are used the excrement...

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