A Peep Into Toorkisthān

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P. Richardson, 1846 - Afghanistan - 238 pages
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Page 172 - ... returns with him to his tent. But it sometimes happens that the woman does not wish to marry the person by whom she is pursued, in which case she will not suffer him to overtake her; and we were assured that no instance occurs of a Calmuck girl...
Page 173 - ... to marry the person by whom she is pursued, in which case she will not suffer him to overtake her; and we were assured that no instance occurs of a Calmuck girl being thus caught, unless she has a partiality for her pursuer. If she dislikes him, she rides, to use the language of English sportsmen, 'neck or nothing...
Page 225 - ... across the stomach. The mangled wretch was still breathing, and a medical man being at hand, measures were instantly taken most calculated to save his life ; but without success, and in a quarter of an hour he was a corpse. Familiar as we were with scenes, which in our own happy land would have excited the horror and disgust of every man possessed of the common feelings of humanity, there was something in this strange murder which caused us to make inquiries, and the reader will hardly believe...
Page 19 - If my reader can imagine a plain, about twenty miles in circumference, laid out with gardens and fields in pleasing irregularity, intersected by three rivulets, which wind through it by a serpentine course, and wash innumerable little forts and villages, he will have before him one of the meadows of Cabool. To the north lie the hills of Pughman, covered half way down with snow, and separated from the eye by a sheet of the richest verdure. On the other side, the mountains, which are bleak and rocky,...
Page 113 - Proceeding through several low arches and smaller caves, they reached at length a vast hall, in the centre of which was * an enormous mass of clear ice, smooth and polished as a mirror, and in the form of a gigantic beehive, with its dome-shaped top just touching the long icicles which depended from the jagged surface of the rock. A small aperture led to the interior of this wonderful congelation...
Page 113 - The inside of this chilly abode was divided into several compartments of every fantastic shape: in some the glittering icicles hung like curtains from the roof; in others, the vault was smooth as glass. Beautifully brilliant were the prismatic colours reflected from the varied surface of the ice, when the torches flashed suddenly upon them as they passed from cave to cave. Around, above, beneath, everything was of solid ice, and being unable to stand on account of its slippery nature, they slid,...
Page 225 - ... and the reader will hardly believe me when I tell him that the victim met his fate with the knowledge and consent of Timour Shah. The woman whom we first observed was the legal murderess. She had that morning been to the Shah Zada and sworn on the Koran that the deceased many years back had murdered her husband and ran away with his other wife; she had demanded redress according to the Mahommedan law — blood for blood.
Page 226 - ... inflicting the punishment on the delinquent, and allow the man to be delivered over to his officers of justice, promising a punishment commensurate with the crime he had committed. But the woman persisted in her demand for the law of the Koran. Her victim was bound and delivered into her hands ; she had him conducted in front of the prince's camp about three hundred yards off, and effected her inhuman revenge with an Affghan knile, a fit instrument for that purpose.
Page 225 - Mahommedan law — blood for blood. The Shah Za.da offered the woman a considerable sum of money if she would waive her claim to right of personally inflicting the punishment on the delinquent, and allow the man to be delivered over to his officers of justice, promising a punishment commensurate with the crime he had committed. But the woman persisted in her demand for the law of the Koran. Her victim was bound and delivered...
Page 104 - Huzareh tribe, with their wives and families " and a stock of provisions, took possession of this " cavern, hoping to escape the fury of the ruthless " invader, and never stirred beyond its mouth. " But the cruel Genghis, after wasting the country

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