Asiatick Researches: Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature, of Asia, Volume 9

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John Murray, 1809 - Asia
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Vol. 2-3, 5-12 have lists of the members of the society.
 

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Page 158 - Tapasya, wishing to remember then every thing he knew in his present generation. This could not be fully granted; but he was indulged with writing upon a brass plate, a few things which he wished more particularly to...
Page 288 - ... a similar practice, and maintaining like opinions and observances. The essential character of the Hindu institutions is the distribution of the people into four great tribes. This is considered by themselves to be the marked point which separates them from MlSc/ihas or Barbarians.
Page 97 - There, having gone through a most severe course of religious austerities and expiatory ceremonies, he was directed to sail upon the river in a boat with white sails, which, if they turned black, would be to him a sure sign of the remission of his sins ; the blackness of which would attach itself to the sails. It happened so, and he joyfully sent the boat adrift, with his sins, into the sea.
Page 328 - Therefore, as the hypotenuse is to its base, so is the radius to a base, from which the sine of the angle, and consequently the angle itself, are known. If it exceed the latitude, the declination is south ; or, if the contrary, it is north. The right ascension of the star is ascertained by calculation from the hour of the night, and from the right ascension of the sun for that time. The declination of the corresponding point of the ecliptic being found, the sum or difference...
Page 311 - London, 1875, pp. 309—448. heavens, and each period of life extending to many hundreds of thousands of years — he quitted the state of a deity to obtain immortality as a saint, and was incarnate towards the close of the fourth age (now past), when 75 years and 8 months of it remained. After he was...
Page 295 - Hindus; an evident sign, that liis sect is subsequent to that, in which this fabulous history is original. The same remark is applicable to the Jainas, with whom the legendary story of their saints also seems to be engrafted on the pauranic tales of the orthodox sect. Sufficient indication of this will appear, in the passages which will be subsequently cited from the writings of the Jainas. Considerable weight might be allowed to an argument deduced from the aggravated extravagance of the fictions...
Page 347 - ... signs or constellations, agreeing in figure and designation with those of the Greeks; and differing merely in the place of the constellations, which are carried on the Indian sphere a few degrees further west than on the Grecian. That the Hindus took the hint of this mode of dividing the ecliptic from the Greeks, is not perhaps altogether improbable; but, if such be the origin of it...
Page 398 - In the scarcity of authentic materials for the ancient, and even for the modern, history of the Hindu race, importance is justly attached to all genuine monuments and especially inscriptions on stone and metal, which are occasionally discovered through various accidents. If these be carefully preserved and diligently examined, and the facts ascertained from them be judiciously employed towards elucidating the scattered information, which can be yet collected from the remains of Indian Literature,...
Page 296 - Indians,* mentions them under the latter designation (<ro<p iroi) as a distinct tribe, ' which, though inferior to the others in number, is superior in rank and estimation : bound to no bodily work, nor contributing any thing from labour to the public use ; in short, no duty is imposed on that tribe, but that of sacrificing to the gods, for the common benefit of the Indians ; and, when any one celebrates a private sacrifice, a person of that class becomes his guide ; as if the sacrifices would not...
Page 293 - Vedas, without any indication of peculiar reverence, would not authorize a presumption against the genuineness of that passage, on my hypothesis; nor, admitting its authenticity, furnish an argument against that system. I suppose both heroes to have been known characters in ancient fabulous history; but conjecture that, on the same basis, new fables have been constructed, elevating those personages to the rank of Gods.

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