Journal of the Franklin Institute

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Franklin Institute, 1832 - Meteorology
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Vols. 1-69 include more or less complete patent reports of the U. S. Patent Office for years 1825-1859. cf. Index to v. 1-120 of the Journal, p. [415]
 

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Page 138 - Description and Draught of a new-invented MACHINE for carrying vessels or ships out of or into any harbour, port or river, against wind and tide, or in a calm...
Page 401 - Now know ye, that in compliance with the said proviso, I, the said Jacob Perkins, do hereby declare the nature of my said invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are particularly described and ascertained in and by the following description thereof, reference being had to the drawings hereunto annexed, and to the figures and letters marked thereon...
Page 166 - These inquiries have led the Committee to believe that the substitution of inanimate for animal power, in draught on common roads, is one of the most important improvements in the means of internal communication ever introduced. Its practicability they consider to have been fully established ; its general adoption will take place more or less rapidly, in proportion as the attention of scientific men shall be drawn by public encouragement to further improvement.
Page 176 - That carriages can be propelled by steam on common roads at an average rate often miles per hour. "2. That at this rate they have conveyed upwards of fourteen passengers. " 3. That their weight, including engine, fuel, water and attendants, may be under three tons. " 4. That they can ascend and descend hills of considerable inclination with facility and safety. " 5. That they are perfectly safe for passengers. •
Page 43 - Now Know Ye, that in compliance with the said proviso, I, the said Adolphe Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement thereof, reference being had to the Drawing hereunto annexed, and to the figures and letters marked thereon...
Page 178 - King, and the other half to him that will sue for the same, to be recovered in an action of debt in any court of record in the united kingdom, with full costs of suit.
Page 310 - Perhaps one of the principal advantages resulting from the use of steam will be, that it may be employed as cheaply at a quick as at a slow rate ; ' this is one of the advantages over horse labour, which becomes more and more expensive, as the speed is increased. There is every reason to expect, that in the end, the rate of travelling by steam will be much quicker than the utmost speed of travelling by horses ; in short, the safety to travellers will become the limit to speed.
Page 341 - Tolls, to an amount which would utterly prohibit the introduction of steam carriages, have been imposed on some roads; on others, the trustees have adopted modes of apportioning the charge which would be found, if not absolutely prohibitory, at least to place such carriages in a very unfair position as compared with ordinary coaches.
Page 47 - Having thus described the nature of my invention, and the manner of carrying the same into effect, I would have it understood, that I do not...
Page 167 - He states, that although a part of the machinery which brings both the propelling wheels into action when the full power of the engine is required, was broken at the onset, yet that, on his return, he performed the last eighty-four miles, from Melksham to Cranford bridge, in ten hours, including stoppages.

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