Memoirs of the Life and Writings of the Honourable Henry Home of Kames: One of the Senators of the College of Justice, and One of the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary in Scotland Containing Sketches of the Progress of Literature and General Improvement in Scotland During the Greater Part of the Eighteenth Century, Volume 1

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1814 - Lawyers
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Page 141 - Most fortunately it happens, that since reason is incapable of dispelling these clouds, nature herself suffices to that purpose, and cures me of this philosophical melancholy and delirium, either by relaxing this bent of mind, or by some avocation, and lively impression of my senses, which obliterate all these chimeras. I dine, I play a game of back-gammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends ; and when after three or four hours...
Page 430 - A singular and unavoidable manner of doing or saying any thing, Peculiar and Natural to one Man only, by which his Speech and Actions are distinguished from those of other men.
Page 362 - I have long been of opinion that the foundations of the future grandeur and stability of the British Empire lie in America; and though, like other foundations, they are low and little now, they are nevertheless broad and strong enough to support the greatest political structure that human wisdom ever yet erected.
Page 421 - Nay then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness, And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now to my setting : I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, j And no man see me more.
Page 88 - Pure as the expanse of Heaven: I thither went, With unexperienced thought, and laid me down On the green bank, to look into the clear Smooth lake, that to me seem'd another sky.
Page 417 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these ? O, I have ta'en Too little care of this ! Take physic, pomp ; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.
Page 127 - God has afforded us of its truth; that the particular parts principally objected against in this whole dispensation, are analogous to what is experienced in the constitution and course of Nature, or Providence ; that the chief objections themselves which are alleged against the former, are no other than what may be alleged with like justness against the latter, where they are found in fact to be inconclusive...
Page 141 - Where am I, or what? From what causes do I derive my existence, and to what condition shall I return? Whose favour shall I court, and whose anger must I dread? What beings surround me? and on whom have I any influence, or who have any influence on me? I am confounded with all these questions, and begin to fancy myself in the most deplorable condition imaginable, environed with the deepest darkness, and utterly deprived of the use of every member and faculty.
Page 417 - I will punish home: No, I will weep no more. In such a night To shut me out! Pour on; I will endure. In such a night as this! O Regan, Goneril! Your old kind father, whose frank heart gave all, — O, that way madness lies; let me shun that; No more of that.
Page 419 - Ma haine va mourir, que j'ai crue immortelle; Elle est morte , et ce cœur devient sujet fidèle ; Et prenant désormais cette haine en horreur, L'ardeur de vous servir succède à sa fureur.

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