Views on the improvement of the Maltese language and its use for the purposes of education and literature

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1838
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Page 21 - I think I may say, that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education.
Page 63 - With reference to biblical criticism and ecclesiastical history, we know that our Scriptures, particularly those of the Old Testament, abound in modes of expression, and allusions to customs, in many cases imperfectly understood in Europe, but still prevailing in the east.
Page 65 - ... information can be obtained relative to the history of those regions, and of the extraordinary persons to whom they have given birth. Their histories of the crusades in particular, which furnish the most authentic details on this interesting subject, will always amuse and instruct the general reader, while they furnish materials of the greatest importance to the historian. In polite literature, and especially in works of fiction...
Page 24 - I his liberty,' rightly understood, consists in the power of doing whatever the laws permit; which is only to be effected by a general conformity of all orders and degrees to those ' equitable rul. j s of action, by which the meanest individual is protected from the insults and oppression of the greatest.
Page 64 - Rabbinical and other commentators, few will deny ; yet volumes on Arabic Grammar, Rhetoric, and the more ancient productions of the Arabian poets, which approach most nearly in style and sentiments to some parts of the Hebrew Bible, still lie in MS. in our libraries, either entirely neglected, or at best accessible to few. 4. In the Syriac language, which approximates still nearer than the Arabic to the Hebrew in its form and modes of expression, there are in our libraries unpublished Grammars and...
Page 64 - Syriac language, which approximates still nearer than the Arabic to the Hebrew in its form and modes of expression, there are in our libraries unpublished Grammars and Dictionaries, and even Commentaries on the Scriptures, written by the Bishops and other learned members of the Oriental churches, together with MS. works of the greatest value to Divines, on Ecclesiastical History and Divinity, composed by the fathers of the Syrian and Arabian churches. The collection also of the late Mr. Rich, now...
Page 65 - ... restoration, as it is to them that Europe owes the rudiments of many of her now highly cultivated arts and sciences. 7. From Asiatic works on the Mathematics and Medicine perhaps much light is not now to be expected. To trace the progress of these sciences, however, under the Caliphat, when science had declined among the Greeks, cannot be uninteresting to the philosopher; and as many of the most celebrated of the Greek authors were translated into Arabic, under the patronage of the court of Bagdad,...
Page 63 - ... country stands with the east, affording as they do the- best opportunities for carrying such a project into effect, and at the same time promising both to England and its eastern possessions the most beneficial results, may be mentioned as additional motives for engaging in such an undertaking.
Page 65 - ... we derived the first elements of our knowledge. In this respect Asia must be recognized as the elder sister and instructress of Europe ; and although the hordes of barbarians, which poured forth like a torrent from her north-western regions, effectually extinguished the light which she at first imparted, yet we are indebted to the Mohammedan courts of Cordova, Grenada, and Seville, for its restoration, as it is to them that Europe owes the rudiments of many of her now highly cultivated arts and...
Page 62 - Arabic tongue, which is blended with the Persian in so singular a manner, that one period often contains both languages wholly distinct from each other in expression and idiom, but perfectly united in sense and construction.

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