The Deep Pull: A Major Advance in the Science of Tides

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FriesenPress, Jul 3, 2018 - Science - 249 pages
As science advances at breakneck speed, it becomes harder to make new discoveries and chart uncharted territory. Yet The Deep Pull: A Major Advance in the Science of Ocean Tides does just that. This book offers the world a new model of tide formation that can actually find a pattern in previously unintelligible tide data and be applied to both oceanic and atmospheric tides. At the heart of this new model is a new theory on where lunisolar gravitational forces act. With this simple key, the author opens a new way of understanding a centuries-old science.

Written for anyone with an interest in the mechanics behind natural phenomena, Walter Hayduk takes the readers through his thought process behind his new discovery. His accessible and engaging, step-by-step manner of uncovering a new paradigm through the exploration of data, analogies, and natural phenomena – from the Bay of Fundy’s incredible tides to tornadoes – provides the reader with the excitement of his or her own eureka moment of understanding the secret of the tides.
 

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Contents

Fig 205 Reykjavik Iceland tide data for May 23June 15 2013 lag time 11 hours
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Table 201 Tide Heights at Six North Atlantic locations
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Fig 211 St Johns Newfoundland tide data May 13June 14 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 212a Tides at Glace Bay Nova Scotia May 23June 13 2014
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Fig 212b Tides at Glace Bay Nova Scotia May 23June 13 2014
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Fig 213 Lunar peripheral belts near Glace Bay at full moon
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Table 31 Results of peripheral belt calculations
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Fig 32 Graphs showing lengths and crosssectional areas of peripheral belts
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Fig 33 Lunar gravitational force equally effective on both sides of the earth
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Fig 41 Earths orbital plane at the summer solstice
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Fig 42 Revolving earth as viewed from the sun
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Fig 51 Suns quarteryear declination
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Fig 52 Changing declinations of lunisolar zeniths
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Fig 53 Changing rates of declinations
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Fig 54 The edge of earths orbital plane
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Fig 61a b Earths orbital plane
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Fig 62a b Different views of earths orbital plane and three peripheral belts
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Fig 63a b Peripheral belts circling the poles
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up to 235 from the poles
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Fig 65 Peripheral belt corresponding to the suns zenith at Dhaka Bangladesh noon June 21
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Fig 66 Peripheral belt for the suns zenith at Accra Ghana noon September 21
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Fig 67 Peripheral belt corresponding to the suns zenith near Antofagasta Chile December 21
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Fig 71 The interaction of the lunisolar zeniths
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Fig 72 The last quarter hypothetical in late June
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Fig 73 Lunisolar peripheral belts for last quarter in June
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Fig 74 Lunar zenith for one complete month starting at the first full moon after the summer solstice
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Fig 81 The ocean currents all around the world
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Fig 91 Variation of earths surface speed versus latitude
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Fig 92 Effect of earths rotational speed on the lunisolar contact time and ocean current speed
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Fig 111 The changing direction of the gravitational pull during one revolution around the earth
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Fig 121 Amphidromic points over shallow ocean regions
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Fig 151 The Southern Ocean and the Agulhas and Benguela Currents
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Fig 161 Lunisolar action in deep ocean crosssection of earth near equatorial plane
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Fig 171 Horta Azores Portugal tide data for May 24June 16 2013 raw data
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Fig 172 Horta Azores tide data for May 24June 16 2013 lag time six hours
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Fig 181 Stages of reversing tides at westfacing shores
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Fig 191 Lisbon Portugal tide data for May 23June 14 2013 lag time eight hours
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Fig 192 Full moon showing joint lunisolar peripheral belts
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Fig 193 Gravitational force at Lisbon at full and new moon
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Fig 201 Six ports on the North Atlantic Ocean
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Fig 202 Rabat Morocco tide data for May 23June 14 2013 lag time eight hours
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FIG 203 La Rochelle France tide data for May 23June 14 2013 lag time 10 hours
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Fig 204 Swansea Wales tide data for May 23June 14 2013 lag time 12 hours
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Fig 221 Ocean currents across the Grand Banks
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Fig 222 Tides at Burntcoat Head Nova Scotia Fundy May 24June 14 lag time 18 hours
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Fig 223 Sketch of Fundy and associated area
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Fig 224 Tides on Bay of Fundy Shores July 2021 2014
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Fig 225 Moon and high tide times for New Brunswick and Maine shores July 20 2014
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Fig 231 Tides at Boston Massachusetts August 23September 13 2014 lag time 17 hours
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Fig 232 Tides at New York City New York August 23September 13 2014 lag time 14 hours
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Fig 233 Tides at Atlantic City New Jersey August 23September 13 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 234 Tides at Virginia Beach Virginia August 23September 13 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 235 Tides at Myrtle Beach South Carolina August 23September 13 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 236 Tides at Daytona Beach Florida August 23September 13 2014 raw data
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Fig 237 Tides at Daytona Beach August 23September 13 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 238 Tides at Miami Harbor Florida August 23September 13 2014 lag time 14 hours
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Fig 241a Tides at Cristobal Panama May 2330 2013 lag time 18 hours
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Fig 241b Tides at Cristobal Panama May 30June 13 2013 lag time 18 hours
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Fig 242 Tides at Cristobal Panama
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Fig 251 Tides at Balboa Panama May 23June 13 2013 lag time nine hours
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Fig 252 Tides on the Pacific side of Panama at Balboa
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Global Positions Relation Between Local and Univeral Times
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Fig 261 Tides at Manzanillo Mexico October 23November 13 2014 lag time 13 hours
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Fig 262 Tides at Mumbai Bombay India October 20November 10 2014 lag time 18 hours
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Fig 263 Crosssection of the earth at 19 N latitude
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Fig 264 Tides at Wake Island United States October 20November 10 2014 lag time nine hours
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Fig 265 Tides at Dakar Senegal October 20November 10 2014 lag time 14 hours
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Table 281 Vapor Pressure for Water and Ice
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Fig 281 Lake effect snow on Lake Huron shores
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Fig 291 Width of atmospheric peripheral belts
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Fig 292 Variation of air pressure and density with altitude
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Temperature Pressure Density and Mass of Atmospheric Air From Sea Level Up
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Fig 293 Effect of lunar gravitational force on different altitudes in the atmosphere
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Fig 301 Effect of a mountain on gravitational traction
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Fig 302 The changing positions of the lunar peripheral belt over Antarctica as seen from above the South Pole
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Fig 303 Outline of Antarctica in summer
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Fig 311 Movement of peripheral belt one quarter cycle
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Fig 312 Lunar peripheral belt over the Arctic as seen from above the North Pole
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Fig 313 Outline of the Arctic Region
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Table 312 Direction From Which the Wind Blows for Places in the Arctic
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Fig 321 Vortex formation from draining vessel equipped with an inverted Ushaped stirrer
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Table 321 Comparison of Dates of Major Tornado Events in The USA and Associated Lunisolar Times
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Fig 331 Determining the jet stream rising rate
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Fig 332 View of peripheral belts from above the North Pole in winter
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About the author (2018)

Walter Hayduk is a chemical engineer and retired university professor who likes to understand how things work and fix them when needed – whether it’s a leaky faucet or a scientific model. He notes, “All my life I have been interested in natural phenomena, including the climate. I have a knack of attacking problems head-on with imaginative ideas, persistence and hard work.” Thus, armed with a globe of the world, almanacs, many diagrams, the Internet, and a lifetime of accumulated information, Walter began his journey to truly understand tide formation, and in particular, the previously unexplained progression of tide times. After more than a year of study, he came up with a paradigm-shifting explanation that just may change how we view the natural world.

Today Walter and his wife, Bev, live in Ottawa, where they enjoy frequenting local coffee shops and appreciating music. Walter is also the author of Crash Course: 157 Causes of Collisions and How to Prevent Them.

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