Complete Poems

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1982 - Literary Criticism - 493 pages
1 Review

Here is the first reliable edition of Keats's complete poems designed expressly for general readers and students.

Upon its publication in 1978, Stillinger's The Poems of John Keats won exceptionally high praise: "The definitive Keats," proclaimed The New Republic--"An authoritative edition embodying the readings the poet himself most probably intended, prepared by the leading scholar in Keats textual studies."

Now this scholarship is at last available in a graceful, clear format designed to introduce students and general readers to the "real" Keats. In place of the textual apparatus that was essential to scholars, Stillinger here provides helpful explanatory notes. These notes give dates of composition, identify quotations and allusions, gloss names and words not included in the ordinary desk dictionary, and refer the reader to the best critical interpretations of the poems. The new introduction provides central facts about Keats's life and career, describes the themes of his best work, and speculates on the causes of his greatness.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

this is very long. i do realise it is complete but still. also i think google scholar should allow for younger students such as year 7 as it is very hard to understand.

Contents

Imitation of Spenser
1
On Peace
2
Stay ruby breasted warbler stay
3
Fill for me a brimming bowl
4
To Lord Byron
5
Written on the Day That Mr Leigh Hunt Left Prison
6
Ode to Apollo
8
To Some Ladies
9
To JR
182
Isabella or The Pot of Basil
184
Mother of Hermes and still youthful Maia
199
Sweet sweet is the greeting of eyes
200
Old Meg she was a gipsey
201
There was a naughty boy
202
Ah ken ye what I met the day
205
To Ailsa Rock
206

On Receiving a Curious Shell and a Copy of Verses from the Same Ladies
10
O come dearest Emma the rose is full blown
11
Woman when I behold thee flippant vain
12
O Solitude if I must with thee dwell
13
To George Felton Mathew
14
Had I a mans fair form then might my sighs
16
Hadst thou livd in days of old
17
I am as brisk
18
Specimen of an Induction to a Poem
19
A Fragment
20
To one who has been long in the city pent
24
Oh how I love on a fair summers eve
25
Happy is England I could be content
26
To My Brother George epistle
27
To Charles Cowden Clarke
30
How many bards gild the lapses of time
33
On First Looking into Chapmans Homer
34
On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour
35
Addressed to the Same
36
To Kosciusko
37
I stood tiptoe upon a little hill
47
Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition
53
On the Grasshopper and the Cricket
54
To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown
55
God of the golden bow
56
This pleasant tale is like a little copse
57
On Seeing the Elgin Marbles
58
On The Story of Rimini
59
Unfelt unheard unseen
60
You say you love but with a voice
61
Before he went to live with owls and bats
62
Oh grant that like to Peter I
63
A Poetic Romance
64
In drear nighted December
163
To Mrs Reynoldss Cat
164
On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
165
When I have fears that I may cease to be
166
O blush not so O blush not so
167
Hence burgundy claret and port
168
Robin Hood
169
Welcome joy and welcome sorrow
171
To the Nile
172
Blue Tis the life of heaven the domain
173
Extracts from an Opera
174
Four seasons fill the measure of the year
176
For theres Bishops Teign
177
Where be ye going you Devon maid
178
Over the hill and over the dale
179
All gentle folks who owe a grudge
207
Of later two dainties were before me placd
208
There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain
209
Not Aladdin magian
210
Read me a lesson Muse and speak it loud
212
On Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey near Inverness
215
Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies
218
And what is Love? It is a doll dressd up
220
Tis the witching time of night
221
Wheres the Poet? Show him show him
222
Fancy
223
Bards of passion and of mirth
225
Spirit here that reignest
226
I had a dove and the sweet dove died
227
Ah woe is me poor Silverwing
228
The Eve of St Agnes
229
The Eve of St Mark
240
Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell
243
As Hermes once took to his feathers light
245
Character of C B
246
Bright star would I were stedfast as thou art
247
A Fragment
248
A Ballad
270
Fire Air Earth and Water
271
Sonnet to Sleep
275
On Fame Fame like a wayward girl
277
On Fame How feverd is the man
278
Ode to a Nightingale
279
Ode to a Grecian Urn
282
Ode on Melancholy
283
Ode on Indolence
284
Shed no tear O shed no tear
286
A Tragedy in Five Acts
287
Lamia
342
Pensive they sit and roll their languid eyes
359
To Autumn
360
A Dream
361
The day is gone and all its sweets are gone
374
To Fanny
376
A Fragment of a Tragedy
378
A Faery Tale by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk Lambeth
384
In after time a sage of mickle lore
408
Abbreviations
411
Selected Bibliography
413
Commentary
417
The Contents of 1817 and 1820
487
Index of Titles and First Lines
489
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1982)

John Keats was born in London, the oldest of four children, on October 31, 1795. His father, who was a livery-stable keeper, died when Keats was eight years old, and his mother died six years later. At age 15, he was apprenticed to an apothecary-surgeon. In 1815 he began studying medicine but soon gave up that career in favor of writing poetry. The critic Douglas Bush has said that, if one poet could be recalled to life to complete his career, the almost universal choice would be Keats, who now is regarded as one of the three or four supreme masters of the English language. His early work is badly flawed in both technique and critical judgment, but, from his casually written but brilliant letters, one can trace the development of a genius who, through fierce determination in the face of great odds, fashioned himself into an incomparable artist. In his tragically brief career, cut short at age 25 by tuberculosis, Keats constantly experimented, often with dazzling success, and always with steady progress over previous efforts. The unfinished Hyperion is the only English poem after Paradise Lost that is worthy to be called an epic, and it is breathtakingly superior to his early Endymion (1818), written just a few years before. Isabella is a fine narrative poem, but The Eve of St. Agnes (1819), written soon after, is peerless. In Lamia (1819) Keats revived the couplet form, long thought to be dead, in a gorgeous, romantic story. Above all it was in his development of the ode that Keats's supreme achievement lies. In just a few months, he wrote the odes "On a Grecian Urn" (1819), "To a Nightingale" (1819), "To Melancholy" (1819), and the marvelously serene "To Autumn" (1819). Keats is the only romantic poet whose reputation has steadily grown through all changes in critical fashion. Once patronized as a poet of beautiful images but no intellectual content, Keats is now appreciated for his powerful mind, profound grasp of poetic principles, and ceaseless quest for new forms and techniques. For many readers, old and young, Keats is a heroic figure. John Keats died in Rome on February 23, 1821 and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery, Rome. His last request was to be placed under a tombstone bearing no name or date, only the words, "Here lies One whose Name was writ in Water.

Jack Stillinger is Professor of English and a permanent member of the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois.

Bibliographic information