Classic Ships of Islam: From Mesopotamia to the Indian Ocean

Front Cover
This book charts the development of Islamic ships and boats in the Western Indian Ocean from the seventh to the early sixteenth century with reference to earlier periods. It utilizes mainly Classical and Medieval Arabic literary sources with iconographical evidence and archaeological finds. The interdependence of various trading activities in the region resulted in a cross fertilization, not only of goods but also of ideas and culture which gave an underlying cohesion to the Arabian, Persian and Indian maritime peoples. This study has led to a re-evaluation of that maritime culture, showing that it was predominantly Persian and Indian, with Chinese influence, throughout the Islamic period until the coming of the Portuguese, as reflected in nautical terminology and technology.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Part Two
35
Part Three
109
Part Four
169
Part Five
263
Part Six
359
Appendices
385
Glossary and Index of General and Maritime Terms
399
Bibliography of Works Cited
427
List of Illustrations Tables Figures and Maps
457
Main Index
463
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Dr Dionisius A. Agius is a Fellow of the British Academy. He currently holds the Al Qasimi Professorship in Arabic and Islamic Material Culture at the University of Exeter and is affiliated with King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah. Author of In the Wake of the Dhow: The Arabian Gulf and Oman (2002, 2010) and Seafaring in the Arabian Gulf and Oman: The People of the Dhow (2005, 2009).