The Interrogation

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Bantam Books, 2002 - Fiction - 286 pages
28 Reviews
"Albert Jay Smalls sits in an interrogation room accused of an unspeakable crime. The police have no witnesses, no physical evidence, but they are certain he is hiding the truth. With less than twelve hours before he must be released, Smalls will be put through one final interrogation. It is a search that leads into the shadowed recesses of one man's shattered mind - and to the devastating secrets buried in a desolate seaside town. It is a quest that takes three desperate cops down a dark, twisting road as they race against the clock to find out what really happened one rainy autumn afternoon in 1952. The answers will be more shocking than anyone can imagine, blurring the boundaries between pursuers and prey, between the innocent and the guilty, between the truth that sets us free and the tragedies that haunt us to the grave."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Review: The Interrogation

User Review  - Hannah Etherton - Goodreads

Haunting tale of how things can be but not always as they seem. So many little bits where clues could have been all put together but no one had all of them Read full review

Review: The Interrogation

User Review  - Goodreads

This was the most depressing story I've ever read, but it reflects the way a lot of real murder investigations usually play out. The police never discovered who committed the crime, but the reader did ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
27
Section 2
38
Section 3
49
Copyright

20 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Thomas H. Cook (b. 1947) is the author of nearly two dozen critically lauded crime novels. Born in Fort Payne, Alabama, Cook published his first novel, "Blood Innocents", in 1980 while serving as the book review editor of "Atlanta "magazine. Two years later, on the release of his second novel, "The Orchids", he turned to writing full-time. Cook published steadily through the 1980s, penning such works as the Frank Clemons trilogy, a series of mysteries starring a jaded cop. He found breakout success with "The Chatham School Affair" (1996), which won an Edgar Award for best novel. His work has been praised by critics for his attention to psychology and the lyrical nature of his prose. Besides mysteries, Cook has written two true-crime books, "Early Graves "(1992) and the Edgar-nominated "Blood Echoes" (1993), as well as several literary novels, including "Elena" (1986). He lives and works in New York City.

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