The Letters of Anne Gilchrist and Walt Whitman

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This 1918 volume provides the complete letters between American poet Walt Whitman and his controversial friend, English writer Anne Gilchrist.?Gilchrist became an avid Walt Whitman fan after reading his?Leaves of Grass. She moved to?Philadelphia?with her children in 1876 after her eldest daughter voiced an interest in attending medical school. There, Anne met Whitman and the two formed a lasting friendship. After writing the first major criticism of?Leaves of Grass?entitled?A Woman's Estimate of Walt Whitman?around 1870, Anne began to hear rumors about the possible romantic relationship between the two. While she and Whitman remained in touch through detailed letters, Anne moved back to England in 1879, never seeing the American poet again.
 

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Page 44 - I speak the pass-word primeval, I give the sign of democracy, By God! I will accept nothing which all cannot have their counterpart of on the same terms.
Page 27 - The man of science seeks truth as a remote and unknown benefactor ; he cherishes and loves it in his solitude ; the poet, singing a song in which all human beings join with him, rejoices in the presence of truth as our visible friend and hourly companion.
Page 40 - And if each and all be aware I sit content. One world is aware and by far the largest to me, and that is myself, And whether I come to my own to-day or in ten thousand or ten million years, I can cheerfully take it now, or with equal cheerfulness I can wait. My foothold is tenon'd and mortis'd in granite, I laugh at what you call dissolution, And I know the amplitude of time.
Page 27 - Men of science should ever create any material revolution, direct or indirect, in our condition, and in the impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present; he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of science, not only in those general indirect effects, but he will be at his side, carrying sensation into the midst of the objects of the science itself.
Page 13 - I know I am deathless, I know this orbit of mine cannot be swept by a carpenter's compass, I know I shall not pass like a child's carlacue cut with a burnt stick at night.
Page 39 - This spiritual Love acts not nor can exist Without Imagination, which, in truth, Is but another name for absolute power And clearest insight, amplitude of mind, And Reason in her most exalted mood.
Page 34 - My spirit has pass'd in compassion and determination around the whole earth, I have look'd for equals and lovers and found them ready for me in all lands, I think some divine rapport has equalized me with them.
Page 54 - Canadian - a year, a century here, and other centuries there - but always one, compact in soul, conscienceconserving, God-inculcating, inspired achievers, not only in literature, the greatest art, but achievers in all art - a new, undying order, dynasty, from age to age transmitted — a band, a class, at least as fit to cope with current years, our dangers, needs, as those who, for their times, so long, so well, in armor or in cowl, upheld and made illustrious, that far-back feudal, priestly world.
Page 32 - SILENT and amazed even when a little boy, I remember I heard the preacher every Sunday put God in his statements, As contending against some being or influence.
Page 10 - Thus in silence in dreams' projections, Returning, resuming, I thread my way through the hospitals, The hurt and wounded I pacify with soothing hand, I sit by the restless all the dark night, some are so young, Some suffer so much, I recall the experience sweet and sad, (Many a soldier's loving arms about this neck have cross'd and rested, Many a soldier's kiss dwells on these bearded lips...

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