A Journal of the Campaign in Flanders

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Рипол Классик, 1846 - History
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A Journal of the Campaign in Flanders. A. D. — 1708. Including the battle of Oudenarde, and the siege of lille.
 

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Page 42 - ... we found ourselves not at all animated by his presence ; and if he was disappointed in us, we were tenfold more so in him. We saw nothing in him that looked like spirit. He never appeared with cheerfulness and vigour to animate us. Our men began to despise him ; some asked if he could speak. His countenance looked extremely heavy. He cared not to come abroad amongst us soldiers, or to see us handle our arms or do our exercise.
Page 6 - Allowance whch was so sparingly distributed amongst us that ye Purser was dayly blest wth ye souldiers Prayers, being grown as fatt as whiping Post : that indeed according to ye old saying : Sharp ye word and sharp ye Deed and so sharp weather ; that for one while I shall care for any more voyages to ye Northward.
Page 42 - I must not conceal, that when we saw the man whom they called our King we found ourselves not at all animated by his presence, and if he was disappointed in us, we were tenfold more so in him. We saw nothing in him that looked like spirit. He never appeared with cheerfulness and vigour to animate us. Our men began to despise him; some asked if he could speak.
Page 6 - In 1710 Jacobite hopes were raised again by the Tory faction's coming to power in Parliament and ousting the Whigs, traditionally the opponents of the Jacobites. The new Government included Robert Harley, Earl of Oxford; Henry St John, Viscount Bolingbroke; and the Duke of Ormonde.
Page 57 - I must ever acknowledge the goodness of God in the success he was pleased to give us ; for I believe Lord Stair will tell you they were in as strong a post as is possible to be found...
Page 43 - He cared not to come abroad amongst us soldiers, or to see us handle our arms or do our exercise. Some said the circumstances he found us in dejected him. I am sure the figure he made dejected us ; and had he sent us but five thousand men of good troops, and never himself come among us, we had done other things than we have now done.
Page 46 - ... favour. To style him inconsistent is by much too gentle an appellation ; for, though from the time he first had a regiment, being under twenty years of age, through the whole course of his great employments, he was never known to sell a place, or even to make those advantages which were universally esteemed allowable and blameless ; yet he was in his own person a most shameless prostitute to power, and extremely avaricious : he indeed would sell nothing but himself, which he continually did,...
Page 61 - Sir Roger Williams, a soldier of Queen Elizabeth's time, in answer to the French Marshal Biron's remark that ' the English march being beaten by the drum was slow, heavy, and sluggish ' ; the reply being, ' That may be true, but, slow as it is, it has traversed your master's country from one end to the other.
Page 41 - The next day I saw the pretended Prince of Wales, who is a handsome sprightly youth. He performs all his exercises to perfection, and is one of the best marksmen in France. He delights so much in shooting, that when he is abroad he will make shift with any sort of victuals, and eat on the grass without linen, perhaps on a sheet of white paper. He bears fatigue so well that he tires all his attendants with walking. He is not like the late King, but very much resembles the Queen ; the young Princess...

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