Major General Andrew Atkinson Humphreys, United States Volunteers, at Fredericksbury, Va: December 13th, 1862, and Farmville, Va., April 7th, 1865

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Press of R.R. McCabe & Company, 1896 - Farmville (Va.), Battle of, 1865 - 60 pages
 

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Page 33 - As the brigade reached the masses of men referred to, every effort was made by the latter to prevent our advance. They called to our men not to go forward, and some attempted to prevent by force their doing so. The effect upon my command was what I apprehended — the line was somewhat disordered, and in part forced to form into a column, but still advanced rapidly. The fire of the enemy's musketry and artillery, furious as it was before, now became still hotter. The stone wall was a sheet of flame...
Page 59 - DC, 1844-49; an( ^ on surveys in the field 1849-50. He was engaged in making a topographic and hydrographic survey of the Delta of the Mississippi River with a view to its protection from inundation, and deepening the channels at its mouth, 1850-51, continuing in general charge of the work and preparing his able and voluminous report thereon, till 1861; in Europe examining means for protecting Delta rivers from inundation...
Page 33 - ... or most of it, was in position near the southern edge of the town, except for a short time, while it was acting in connection with Humphreys's division, as will be seen hereafter. Some of the very best fighting that was done at Fredericksburg was done by the Third Division of the Fifth Corps. The division was commanded by General Humphreys, who was probably the best officer in the Army of the Potomac that day. He was a thoroughly educated soldier, possessed of a quick eye and a clear head, and...
Page 34 - The stone wall was a sheet of flame that enveloped the head and flanks of the column. Officers and men were falling rapidly, and the head of the column was at length brought to a stand when close up to the wall. Up to this time, not a shot had been fired by the column, but now some firing began. It lasted but a minute, when, in spite cf all our efforts, the column turned and began to retire slowly.
Page 56 - There,' they said in Philadelphia (I am told), ' the generals of the Army of the Potomac are laggards ; it required Sheridan and Grant to overtake and beat Lee.
Page 60 - ... July 1, 1862. Appointed Brigadier General, United States Volunteers, April 28, 1862, he was placed in command of a division of new troops at Washington, DC, September, 1862, and served in the Maryland campaign (Army of the Potomac), September-November, 1862, being engaged in covering Frederick, Md., September 16, 1862; pursuit of enemy from Antietam, September 18, 1862; reconnaissance in Shenandoah Valley, October 16-17, 1862, and march to Falmouth, Va., October-November, 1862; in the Rappahannock...
Page 56 - Ewell, Kershaw, Barton, Corse, and many other general officers, several thousand prisoners, and a large number of cannon, and expects to force Lee to surrender all that is left of his army. Details will be given as speedily as possible, but telegraph is working badly.
Page 18 - ... it was their duty to hold what they had gained ; just as some of the same regiments did, eighteen months later, after the fatal charge at Cold Harbor. It is very likely true that among those thousands, a few may have called out to Allabach's and Tyler's men that it was useless to go forward ; but their own situation on that plain, swept by fire, is proof enough that such men were very few, if, indeed, the story is not the tale of some colonel or captain to excuse the breaking of his own command....

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