The Erotic Life of Racism

Front Cover
Duke University Press, Apr 13, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 168 pages
7 Reviews
A major intervention in the fields of critical race theory, black feminism, and queer theory, The Erotic Life of Racism contends that theoretical and political analyses of race have largely failed to understand and describe the profound ordinariness of racism and the ways that it operates as a quotidian practice. If racism has an everyday life, how does it remain so powerful and yet mask its very presence? To answer this question, Sharon Patricia Holland moves into the territory of the erotic, understanding racism's practice as constitutive to the practice of racial being and erotic choice.

Reemphasizing the black/white binary, Holland reinvigorates critical engagement with race and racism. She argues that only by bringing critical race theory, queer theory, and black feminist thought into conversation with each other can we fully envision the relationship between racism and the personal and political dimensions of our desire. The Erotic Life of Racism provocatively redirects our attention to a desire no longer independent of racism but rather embedded within it.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star

Review: The Erotic Life of Racism

User Review  - Kathleen - Goodreads

I'm sure that Holland makes some fantastic points in this book. However, it's so poorly written that whatever good points I encountered got lost in my frustration with the unstructured, unfocused prose. Read full review

Review: The Erotic Life of Racism

User Review  - Garrett Hoffman - Goodreads

Dense, highly theoretical, still struggling with a lot of what she was saying BUT thought provoking, nonetheless. Interested in a re-read after a few months sitting on her ideas. Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2012)

Sharon Patricia Holland is Associate Professor of English at Duke University. She is the author of Raising the Dead: Readings of Death and Black Subjectivity and the coeditor of Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country, both also published by Duke University Press.

Bibliographic information