The Semitic Languages

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, 1997 - Foreign Language Study - 572 pages
The Semitic Languages presents a unique, comprehensive survey of individual languages or language clusters from their origins in antiquity to their present-day forms.
The Semitic family occupies a position of great historical and linguistic significance: the spoken and written languages of the Phoenicians, Hebrews and Arabs spread throughout Asia and northern and central Africa; the Old Semitic civilizations in turn contributed significantly to European culture; and modern Hebrew, modern literary Arabic, Amharic, and Tigrinya have become their nations' official languages.
The book is divided into three parts and each chapter presents a self-contained article, written by a recognized expert in the field.
* I. General Issues: providing an introduction to the grammatical traditions, subgrouping and writing systems of this language family.
* II. Old Semitic Languages
* III. Modern Semitic Languages
Parts II and III contain structured chapters, which enable the reader to access and compare information easily. These individual descriptions of each language or cluster include phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis and dialects.
Suggestions are made for the most useful sources of further reading and the work is comprehensively indexed.
 

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Contents

Genetic Subgrouping of the Semitic Languages
3
Scripts of Semitic Languages
16
The Arabic Grammatical Tradition
46
The Hebrew Grammatical Tradition
59
Akkadian
69
Amorite and Eblaite
100
Ugaritic
131
Ancient Hebrew
145
Arabic Dialects and Maltese
263
Modern Hebrew
312
The NeoAramaic Languages
334
The Modern South Arabian Languages
378
Tigrinya
424
Tigre
446
Amharic and Argobba
457
The Silte Group East Gurage
509

Phoenician and the Eastern Canaanite Languages
174
Classical Arabic
187
Sayhadic Epigraphic South Arabian
220
Geez Ethiopic
242
Outer South Ethiopic
535
Index
550
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About the author (1997)

Robert Hetzron is formerly of the Department of Germanic, Oriental and Slavic Languages, University of California at Santa Barbara.