Report on Some of the More Remarkable Hardy Ornamental Plants Raised in the Horticultural Society's Garden from Seeds Received from David Douglas in the Years 1831-33, Part 2

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1834 - 8 pages
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Page 7 - N. phacelib'ides, its habit is less straggling than that of N. parviflora and N. peduncularis. N. insignis is stated to require a rich soil, not damp, and a situation fully exposed to the sun; and to be protected carefully from wet when forming its seeds, or they will not ripen. It is figured from the London Horticultural Society's garden ; where " it has produced its seeds very sparingly, with all the care that could be given to it.
Page 6 - The secondary segments are from a quarter to half an inch long ; those nearest the axis, sessile and distinct, the upper ones confluent ; they are green on both sides, nearly glabrous, but covered with asperities. The flowers are of a light bluish violet colour, nearly sessile along one sided spirally incurved racemes, forming together a dense dichotomous panicle placed at some distance from the upper leaves ; the calyxes are covered with bristly hairs. " It is a hardy annual, thriving in any soil...
Page 5 - perhaps the handsomest of the new Polemoniaceae received from California, both from the general appearance of the plant, and the abundance and brilliancy of colour of the flowers. It grows to the height of about a foot, with an erect stem, and foliage much resembling that of G. capitata, but the flowers are very much longer, and instead of being collected in globose heads widely spread at the end of long peduncles, they are few in number in each head ; but the peduncles being much shorter and very...
Page 2 - ... into linear segments. The long slender tube of the corolla projects beyond these leaves, and bears at the top five spreading oval divisions, varying in colour from white to pale blue and pink. The multitude of these flowers gives the plant a very gay appearance, and as it is perfectly hardy and promises to seed well, there is no doubt but that in a short time it will be found an important addition to our flower-beds.
Page 2 - Literally slender-lube, in aUWun to the structure of the corolla. base into a number of linear segments, so as to appear to be whorled. The flowers are collected into terminal heads, surrounded at their base by a number of floral leaves, divided, like the stem leaves, into...
Page 6 - Sarawak is situated near a river, upon slightly elevated ground : eaeh grave is entirely eovered with a huge bundle of wood, piled to the height of a foot and a half or two feet, and kept together by means of a transverse eross.
Page 2 - This is a bushy annual, growing to the height of eight or ten inches. The flowers are collected into terminal heads, surrounded at their base by a number of floral leaves. The long slender tube, of the corolla projects beyond these leaves, and bears at the top five spreading oval divisions, varying in colour from white to pale blue and pink.
Page 6 - ... phacelioides has long since disappeared ; and we fear this brilliant Californian species, which flowered in August 1833, in the garden of the Horticultural Society, will scarcely be found more manageable. Mr. Bentham gives the following account of it in the Transactions of the Horticultural Society : — " This elegant species of Nemophila is readily distinguished by the size of the flowers, which are larger even than those of N. phacelioides, (figured in the Botanical Magazine, t. 2373.) It...
Page 6 - ... Horticultural Society : — " This elegant species of Nemophila is readily distinguished by the size of the flowers, which are larger even than those of N. phacelioides, (figured in the Botanical Magazine, t. 2373.) It is a low procumbent herb, but less straggling than the parviflora and peduncularis. The leaves are from one to two inches long, green, with a few rigid hairs; the lobes from 3 to 5 on each side, deeply cut, but not reaching the midrib, of nearly equal size on the same leaf, ovate...
Page 5 - Trans, ns vol. 1. t. 18./. 3. Mr. Bentham, in his account of this in the Transactions of the Horticultural Society, remarks that it is " perhaps the handsomest of the new Polemoniaceae received from California, both from the general appearance of the plant, and the abundance and brilliancy of colour of the flowers. It grows to the height of about a foot, with an erect stem, and foliage much resembling that of G.

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