The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass: From 1817-1882

Front Cover
Christian Age Office, 1882 - African American abolitionists - 454 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
6
III
10
IV
13
V
21
VI
26
VII
33
VIII
40
XXI
160
XXII
167
XXIII
172
XXIV
185
XXV
190
XXVI
196
XXVII
202
XXVIII
227

IX
45
X
51
XI
56
XII
63
XIII
70
XIV
78
XV
89
XVI
101
XVII
108
XVIII
119
XIX
128
XX
149
XXIX
256
XXX
276
XXXI
293
XXXII
308
XXXIII
329
XXXIV
352
XXXV
360
XXXVI
399
XXXVII
412
XXXVIII
424
XXXIX
431

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Page 87 - And that servant, which knew his lord's will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes. But he that knew not, and did commit things worthy of stripes, shall be beaten with few stripes. For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required; and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more.
Page 320 - Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with, or even before, the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph and a result less fundamental and astounding.
Page 124 - And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul, the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. Howbeit, that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural ; and afterward that which is spiritual.
Page 212 - Hear my prayer, O Lord, and give ear unto my cry ; Hold not thy peace at my tears : For I am a stranger with thee, And a sojourner, as all my fathers were.
Page 320 - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow and his orphans, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and a lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.
Page 380 - A spade, a rake, a hoe, A pick-axe, or a bill ; A hook to reap, a scythe to mow, A flail, or what you will.
Page 115 - I did, come what might; that he had used me like a brute for six months, and that I was determined to be used so no longer. With that, he strove to drag me to a stick that was lying just out of the stable door. He meant to knock me down.
Page 67 - I did not understand them; for I feared they might be treacherous. White men have been known to encourage slaves to escape, and then, to get the reward, catch them and return them to their masters.
Page 366 - American liberty, may my right hand forget her cunning, and my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, if I hesitate or waver, in the support I give him.
Page 137 - This is to certify that I, the undersigned, have given the bearer, my servant, full liberty to go to Baltimore, and spend the Easter holidays. Written with mine own hand, &c., 1835. WILLIAM HAMILTON, Near St. Michael's, in Talbot county, Maryland.

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