Travels in Circassia, Krim-tartary, &c: including a steam voyage down the Danube, from Vienna to Constantinople, and round the Black sea, Volume 2

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H. Colburn, 1839 - Black Sea
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Page 302 - And he will be a wild man ; his hand will be against every man, and every man's hand against him ; and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.
Page 162 - Caucasus not so much for the value of the territory as [for its significance as] a pied a terre to prepare for future conquests. Can we, therefore, wonder at the suppressed murmur of universal hatred which is heard throughout the East at the very name of Russia? Every advantage gained by the Circassians over their oppressors is hailed by the Oriental, whether Mahometan, Christian or Jew, with the most enthusiastic delight. Of the sacrifices and generosity of the Turks in behalf of the poor mountaineers,...
Page 195 - SERENADE IN CIRCASSIA WAR-CRY OF THE CIRCASSIANS — INTRODUCTION TO THE FAMILY OF THE CHIEF — BEAUTY OF THE WOMEN — THEIR MANNERS AND COSTUME — OCCUPATIONS OF THE CIRCASSIANS. To attempt giving you a detailed description of my route is impossible, as it lay across a country, wild as if no other foot had trodden it save that of the beasts of the forest; it was not merely up hill and down dale, but over a succession of dizzy precipices, savage glens, and frightful defiles, bared, broken, entwined,...
Page 285 - Who would fly when danger calls ? Freemen's hearts are freedom's walls Heav'n receives alone the brave — Angels guard the patriot's grave ! Beats there here a traitor's heart, Duped by wily Moscov art, Who his land for gold would give ? Let him die, or childless live I 6.
Page 208 - Circassian men never intermarry with any other race than their own, they preserve their lineage uncontaminated, a father paying more attention to the beauty of feature and form in a wife for his son, than any other consideration; and, if I have been rightly informed, a prince, or usden, never sells his daughter, except to one of his own nation and rank. My first impression at Pitzounda, on seeing a number of Caucasians together, was, that they were decidedly of Grecian origin. This, however, I found,...
Page 294 - Circassian warriors halted to pray in a cottage said to have been a favorite stopping-place of Sheikh Mansur: No situation could have been better adapted as the headquarters of a guerrilla chieftain: the only approach was by a drawbridge over a deep chasm that, once passed, there was an easy communication opened with the whole of the surrounding mountains and glens, capable of serving as a secure retreat to a numerous population, and from whence they could at any time issue and deal destruction on...
Page 350 - The anniversary of the death of a distinguished warrior, or chief, is celebrated for years with praying and feasting ; to which we may add horse-racing, and various kinds of martial and athletic exercises.
Page 206 - Circassia were the young and married ; for, being divested of the leathern confinement, their forms had expanded into all the luxuriance of womanhood. At first sight we might be inclined to think there was an undue share of embonpoint in the figure ; but this is caused more from the custom of wearing wide Oriental trousers, than any defect of nature. In short, beauty of feature and symmetry of form, for which this people are celebrated...
Page 207 - Europe, of the advantage of a pretty person, use every artificial means, by cosmetics, &c., to improve their beauty. Still, the traveller who may read my account, and expects to find the whole population such as I have described, will be wofully disappointed, should he find himself, on arriving in Circassia, surrounded by a tribe of Nogay Tartars, Calmucks, Turcomans, or even the Lesghi. The latter, however, a fine warlike race, are nearly equal, in personal appearance, to the Circassians, but more...
Page 209 - ... very shoes, but plaited camels' and goats' hair into mantles, made cushions for the saddle, housings for the horse, and sheaths for swords and poniards. Nor were they less expert in the art of cookery or the management of the dairy; and sometimes even displayed their agricultural skill in the fields, the whole wardrobe of finery being reserved for visits of ceremony. My host was equally industrious; for, besides building, with his own princely hands, the little cottages he occupied, he was his...

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