Proceedings, Volume 1

Front Cover
Russell & Jones, 1859 - Natural history
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - It is the habit of this fish to ply these arms rapidly before its mouth while it swims, and to clasp with the utmost closeness and obstinacy whatever body it has once inclosed. In this way, the boats of fishermen have often been dragged from their moorings and overset, by the Devil-fish having laid hold of the grapnel.
Page 95 - American Fall, except by the abstraction of that body of water, and had now assumed the position F H. With respect to its future condition, the Canadian Fall may be regarded as consisting of two portions, the one, FH, corresponding, in its relations to the strata beneath, to the original fall A A', and the other, FG, in like relations, corresponding to the American Fall. If this view be correct, the general course of the Canadian Fall will be towards the point I, and the formation finally of a fall...
Page 54 - In memory of Thomas Walter. A native of Hampshire in England and many years a resident of this State. He died in the beginning of the year 1788. Aetatis cir. 48 ann. To a mind liberally endowed by nature and refined by a liberal education he added a taste for the study of Natural History and in the department of Botany science is much indebted to his labours. At his desire he was buried in this spot, once the garden in which were cultivated most of the Plants of his FLORA CAROLINIANA.
Page 40 - They feed mostly upon the windward shores of the inlet, where the small fish chiefly congregate ; and their presence upon the feeding ground is indicated by a slight projection above the water of one of their wings. The motion is so rapid and bird-like, that none who have once seen it will mistake, or ascribe it to any other fish. Sometimes, though not often, you may approach him while feeding in shallow water, near enough to strike ; but the best opportunity is offered by waiting quietly near the...
Page 49 - Description of some Remains of Fishes from the Carboniferous and Devonian Formations of the United States.
Page 134 - Of the habitat of the hydroid he says, "The coryne which bears this medusa is rather rare, as is also the medusa. It is found growing on sponges a little above dead low water mark. It has been found during the summer months, and whether or not it exists during the winter (as in all probability it does), has not been ascertained. A young bitentaculate, but free medusa, has been found as early as the fifth of June. A fully developed specimen has occurred in the end of July, while as late as the twelfth...
Page 40 - ... indicated by a slight projection above the water of one of their wings. The motion is so rapid and bird-like, that none who have once seen it will mistake, or ascribe it to any other fish. Sometimes, though not often, you may approach him while feeding in shallow water, near enough to strike ; but the best opportunity is offered by waiting quietly near the spot where he has disappeared, until, having ceased to feed, he strikes out for the deep water, and having reached it, begins a series of...
Page 252 - In connection with these crucibles, he uses a lamp of peculiar construction, in which the vapor of any liquid hydrocarbon, as oil of turpentine, is completely consumed by means of an artificial blast of air. By means of this instrument the fusion of felspar can be accomplished with facility. It has been found that the platinum metals fused in these crucibles, present properties very different from those heretofore attributed to them, the lime serving to deprive them of osmium and silicon. As much...
Page 100 - ... velocity of the stream, such as the space passed through in a given time by objects floating in the stream, etc., the following method might be practised, by observations on the parabola described by the cascades at different points. Direct the centre of the cross wires of a theodolite to the summit S of the curve of the cascade at a distance from the instrument known by survey, then turn the telescope through a known horizontal angle to the point O, then depress the telescope through a known...
Page 247 - ... found on the tropical banks of the Jordan, but too beautiful to be omitted ; the oleander, with its bright blossoms and dark-green leaves, giving the aspect of a rich garden to any spot where it grows. It is, however, never alluded to in the Scriptures, unless, as has been conjectured, it is the " tree planted by the ' streams ' of water, which bringeth forth his fruit in due season," and

Bibliographic information