A Brief Guide to Secret Religions

Front Cover
Robinson, 2011 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 404 pages
3 Reviews
This wide-ranging book explores the diversity of esoteric and occult beliefs.
Neo-Paganism is one of the fastest-growing new religions in the western world where witchcraft or Wicca, Druidry, and Urban Shamanism are thriving. Alongside this there has been an upsurge in New Age ideas of an even wider variety, including astrology, Tarot, numerology, and many others. And then there are members of various schools of occult science, practicing High Magic.
Why this new interest in old beliefs? Why are millions of educated people today abandoning both the established religion of their parents and 21st century scientific rationalism and turning to magic and esoteric teachings? In their search for spirituality those who follow these paths claim to be applying ancient wisdom to the modern world.  A Brief Guide to Secret Religions, a companion book to A Brief History of Secret Societies, looks at the history and variety of these esoteric movements, where they came from and what they tell us about the world today.

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Review: A Brief Guide to Secret Religions

User Review  - Jessie B. - Goodreads

This book is an excellent starting point on a wide range of occult, new age and pagan beliefs. It provides basic information in a very non-biased fashion. An excellent reference. Read full review

Review: A Brief Guide to Secret Religions

User Review  - Fredrick Danysh - Goodreads

This work is a look at alternative non-Christian religions and people who developed them or played major roles. It covers the Wicca, Pagan, and New Age beliefs. This comes across as more of an intellectual study. Read full review

About the author (2011)

David V. Barrett has written numerous books on new religions and esoteric movements. His book "The New Believers" was described as "an excellent guide to fringe religions that juxtaposes 'respectable' movements and those conventionally dismissed as cults" (Daily Telegraph) and a "no-nonsense, comprehensive survey packed with non-judgmental information about the beliefs, aims and activities of such movements" (Daily Mail). Michael Baigent wrote of "A Brief History of Secret Societies": "In a field normally typified by confusion and ignorance this book by David Barrett is clear, concise, informative and to be recommended." He has a PhD in the Sociology of Religion.

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