Narrative and the Self

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Indiana University Press, Nov 22, 1991 - Literary Criticism
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Examining the constitutive role of language and narration in key areas of human experience, Narrative and the Self articulates a view of the self as the implied subject of narrative utterances. Anthony Paul Kerby draws on the diverse insights of recent work in philosophy, literary theory, and psychology to synthesize a coherent and provocative view of narrative identity and selfhood. Invoking the writings of Benveniste, Ricoeur, Merleau-Ponty, Lacan, Taylor, and other theorists, he argues that language and narration play a central role in key aspects of human experience such as emotion, values, recollection, and sense of history.

Fundamental to Kerby's exposition is a defense of the quasi-narrative nature of our everyday experience. Kerby delineates a convincing narrative model of the self and offers a valuable overview of contemporary philosophical issues surrounding the place and role of narrative in human experience.

 

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Contents

Time and Memory
15
On Narrative
32
The Subject
65
Conclusion
109
NOTES
115
BIBLIOGRAPHY
133
INDEX
139
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