Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education

Front Cover
Ferdig, Richard E.
IGI Global, Jul 31, 2008 - Technology & Engineering - 1762 pages

Games and gaming have always been an important part of society and culture. Within the last 35 years, due to numerous technology innovations, electronic games in many formats have not only become ubiquitous in everyday recreational life but have also permeated many professional fields and disciplines for multiple purposes including teaching and learning.

The Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education presents a framework for understanding games for educational purposes while providing a broader sense of current related research. Compiling over 50 groundbreaking research studies from leading international authorities in the field, this advanced and uniquely comprehensive reference is a must-have for academic and research libraries and for all those interested in expanding their theoretical and practical knowledge of the exciting field of electronic gaming.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Foreword
xlvii
Preface
xlix
About the Editor
liii
Acknowledgment
liv
A Review of Research on Educational Gaming
lviii
A Qualitative MetaAnalysis of Computer Games as Learning Tools
1
Games Claims Genres and Learning
33
Massively Multiplayer Online RolePlay Games for Learning
51
Experience Cognition and Video Game Play
776
Intertextuality in Massively MultiPlayer Online Games
791
Development Identity and GameBased Learning
808
Play Styles and Learning
826
Playing Roles in the MMORPG Kingdom of Loathing
847
Exploring Personal Myths from The Sims
862
The Pyschological Impact of Educational Gaming Part 2 Violence Emotion Race Gender and Culture
875
Learning Processes and Violent Video Games
876

An Investigation of Current Online Educational Games
67
Augmented Reality Gaming in Education for Engaged Learning
83
Mobility Games and Education
96
Game Interfaces as Bodily Techniques
111
A Window on Digital Games Interactions in Home Settings
127
Enhanced Interaction in Mixed Social Environments
146
Electronic Gaming in Germany as Innovation in Education
163
Educational Gaming in K12 or Teacher Education Contexts
178
A Guide to Integrating COTS Games into Your Classroom
179
Productive Gaming and the Case for Historiographic GamePlay
200
GameBased Historical Learning
219
The Role of MMORPGs in Social Studies Education
235
Video Games Reading and Transmedial Comprehension
251
COTS Computer Game Effectiveness
277
Teacher Gamers vs Teacher NonGamers
295
Using Online Simulation to Engage Users in an Authentic Learning Environment
315
PreService Computer Teachers as 3D Educational Game Designers
331
Adolescents Teaching Video Game MakingWho is the Expert Here?
345
Educational Gaming in Other Learning Contexts
356
Online Games as Powerful Food Advertising to Children
358
Changing Health Behavior Through Games
370
An Overview of Using Electronic Games for Health Purposes
388
MMORPGs and Foreign Language Education
402
A Video Game a Chinese Otaku and Her Deep Learning of a Language
422
Developing a Serious Game for Police Training
451
GameBased Learning in Design History
478
A Policy Game in a Virtual World
489
Teaching OOP and COP Technologies via Gaming
508
Using Games to Teach Design Patterns and Computer Graphics
525
A 3D Environment for Exploring Algebraic Structure and Behavior
546
Surviving the Game
560
Educational Gaming Research Tools and Methods
576
Wag the Kennel Games Frames and the Problem of Assessment
577
Character Attachment in Games as Moderator for Learning
593
Visual Analysis of Avatars in Gaming Environments
606
Interpreting GamePlay Through Existential Ludology
621
On Choosing Games and What Counts as a Good Game
636
Descriptors of Quality Teachers and Quality Digital Games
652
The Pyschological Impact of Educational Gaming Part 1 Cognition Learning Play and Identity
669
Designing a Computational Model of Learning
671
Social Psychology and Massively Multiplayer Online Learning Games
702
Evaluating and Managing Cognitive Load in Games
719
SelfRegulated Learning in Video Game Environments
738
Self Educational Effects of Computer Gaming Cultures
757
Harnessing the Emotional Potential of Video Games
893
Gamers Gender and Representation
911
Gender and Racial Stereotypes in Popular Video Games
922
Can the Subaltern Play and Speak or Just be Played With?1
938
Culturally Responsive Games and Simulations
956
Saving Worlds with Video Game Activism
970
Section VII Educational Game Design
987
Conceptual Play Spaces
989
The Design Play and Experience Framework
1010
Revealing New Hidden Curriculum and Pedagogy of
1025
Game Design as a Compelling Experience
1041
Gaming Ethics Rules Etiquette and Learning
1057
Designing GamesBased Embedded Authentic Learning1 Experiences
1068
Bridging Game Development and Instructional Design
1088
GaME Design for Intuitive Concept Knowledge
1104
Leveraging the Affordances of an Electronic Game to Meet Instructional Goals
1127
Instructional Game Design Using Cognitive Load Theory
1143
Motivation Learning and Game Design
1166
Designing Games for Learning
1183
Interaction with MMOGs and Implications for ELearning Design
1204
Narrative Development and Instructional Design
1218
Children as Critics of Educational Computer Games Designed by Other Children
1234
Video Game Creation as a Learning Experience for Teachers and Students
1257
The Future of Educational Gaming
1273
The Future of Digital GameBased Learning
1274
Artists in the Medium
1289
The Positive Impact Model in Commercial Games
1303
Education and Exploitation Off the Virtual Trail to Oregon
1318
Appendix Glossary of Terms
1332
Chapters I LXXVI
1333
Appendix Selected Readings
1353
Games and Simulations A New Approach in Education?
1354
Developing Enjoyable Second Language Learning Software Tools A Computer Game Paradigm
1372
Game Mods Customizable Learning in a K16 Setting
1390
Online Games for 21st Century Skills
1400
GameBased Instruction in a College Classroom
1427
Creative Remixing and Digital Learning Developing an Online Media Literacy Learning Tool for Girls
1440
Learning While Playing Design Implications for Edutainment Games
1449
Reliving History with Reliving the Revolution Designing Augmented Reality Games to Teach the Critical Thinking of History
1460
Insights into the Impact of Social Networks on Evolutionary Games
1477
About the Contributors
1487
Index
1509
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Richard E. Ferdig is the Summit Professor of Learning Technologies and Professor of Instructional Technology at Kent State University. He works within the Research Center for Educational Technology and also the School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences. He earned his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Michigan State University. He has served as researcher and instructor at Michigan State University, the University of Florida, the Wyzsza Szkola Pedagogiczna (Krakow, Poland), and the Universit degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia (Italy). At Kent State University, his research, teaching, and service focus on combining cutting-edge technologies with current pedagogic theory to create innovative learning environments. His research interests include online education, educational games and simulations, and what he labels a deeper psychology of technology. In addition to publishing and presenting nationally and internationally, Ferdig has also been funded to study the impact of emerging technologies such as K-12 Virtual Schools. Rick is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Gaming and Computer Mediated Simulations, the Associate Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, and currently serves as a Consulting Editor for the Development Editorial Board of Educational Technology Research and Development and on the Review Panel of the British Journal of Educational Technology. [Editor]

Bibliographic information