China; political, commercial, and social; an official report

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Page 285 - They are represented to be a nervous, vigorous people, whose bodily and mental powers assimilate much nearer to those of Europe, than what is attributed to Asiatics in general. Their features are masculine, and perfectly European, with the exception of the small lengthened Tartar eye, which almost universally prevails, and is the only feature of resemblance between them and the Chinese. The complexion is perfectly fair, and indeed blooming, the women of the higher classes being equally fair with...
Page 241 - Behold, these shall come from far: and, lo, these from the north and from the west; and these from the land of Sinim.
Page 236 - ... plans ; that his late Majesty has laid the duty on me — and Heaven's throne should not be long vacant— I have done violence to my feelings, and forced myself to intermit awhile my heartfelt grief, that I may with reverence obey the unalterable decree ; and on the 27th of the 8th moon...
Page 297 - Japan, with their ships and merchandise, without any hindrance to them or their goods ; and to abide, buy, sell, and barter, according to their own manner with all nations ; to tarry here as long as they think good, and to depart at their pleasure.
Page 392 - ... God according to the rites of their religion. Four young students and two of a more advanced age, acquainted with the Russian and Latin languages, shall also be received into this house, the Ambassador wishing to leave them at Peking, to learn the languages of the country. They shall be maintained at the expense of the Emperor, and shall be at liberty to return to their own country as soon as they have finished their studies.
Page 329 - Afterwards, having transgressed the laws, they were restricted or expelled. Now, we, coming for the first time, and not having done wrong, request permission to carry on a friendly intercourse on the ancient footing.
Page 65 - Whether, in the successive military operations on the western frontiers, there may have been the horrors of human slaughter for the sake of imperial rewards ? Whether the largesses bestowed on the afflicted southern provinces were properly applied ; or the people were left to die in the ditches?
Page 137 - Thus we see our situation clearly made responsible for the acts of between two and three thousand individuals who are daily coming in contact with the lowest of the Chinese, and exposed to assaults so wanton, and often so barbarous, as well as to robberies so extensive, that self-defence imposes upon them the necessity of attacking their assailants in a manner from whence death must often ensue.
Page 73 - The Chinese are a reading people, and the number of their published works is very considerable. In the departments of morals, history, biography, the drama, poetry, and romance, there is no lack of writings,
Page 36 - an invitation to an entertainment is not supposed to be given with sincerity, until it has been renewed three or four times in 'writing. A card is sent on the evening before the entertainment; another, on the morning of the appointed day; and a third, when every thing is prepared...

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