The Journal of Foreign Medical Science and Literature, Volume 6

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A. Finley, 1816 - Medicine
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Page 272 - Lute, coming close thereto, in order to try to repair it, I observed that the Spirit which issued out caught fire at the Flame of the Candle, and continued burning with violence as it issued out in a stream, which I blew out, and lighted again, alternately for several times.
Page 109 - He was very communicative, and willing to instruct any that were modest and respectfull to him. And in order to my journey, dictated to me, what to see, what company to keep, what bookes to read, how to manage my studyes : in short, he bid me go to the fountaine head, and read Aristotle, Cicero, Avicenna, and did call the neoteriques s . . t-breeches.
Page 106 - Edge-hill with him ; and during the fight, the Prince and Duke of York were committed to his care. He told me that he withdrew with them under a hedge, and took out of his pocket a book and read ; but he had not read very long before a bullet of a great gun grazed on the ground near him, which made him remove his station.
Page 110 - ... it were frost, on the leads of Cockaine house, putt them into a payle of water, till he was almost dead with cold, and betake himselfe to his stove, and so 'twas gonne.
Page 106 - He was always very contemplative, and the first that I hear of that was curious in anatomy in England. He had made dissections of frogs, toads, and a number of other animals, and had curious observations on them ; which papers, together with his goods, in his lodgings at Whitehall, were plundered at the beginning of the rebellion...
Page 446 - ... smaller pipe immediately behind the cock, and to carry the other end to as high a level as the water in the cistern; and now it was found that on shutting the cock the pipe did not burst as before, but a jet of considerable height was forced from the upper end of this new pipe : it therefore became necessary to increase...
Page 103 - Milk is the real antidote of muriate of tin, by which it is completely coagulated. The coagulum contains muriatic acid and oxide of tin, and is not deleterious.
Page 387 - ... straps, spread with adhesive plaster and applied over wounds for the purpose of keeping their sides in contact, were dissolved by the fluids discharged from the wound, it appeared to me that ligatures might be made of leather, or of some other animal substance, with which the sides of a...
Page 108 - I first sawe him at Oxford, 1642, after Edgehill fight, but was then too young to be acquainted with so great a doctor. I remember he came severall times to our Coll. (Trin.) to George Bathurst, BD who had a hen to hatch egges in his chamber, which they daily opened to see the progress and way of generation.
Page 109 - I have heard him say, that after his book of the circulation of the blood came out, he fell mightily in his practice, and 'twas believed by the vulgar that he was crack-brained ; and all the physicians were against his opinion, and envied him; with much ado at last, in about twenty or thirty years' time, it was received in all the universities in the world, and as Mr. Hobbes says in his book, 'De Corpore...

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