Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism

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Resistance Books, Jan 1, 1999 - Capitalism - 147 pages
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Review: Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism

User Review  - Jonathan Chapple - Goodreads

It seemed natural to read this immediately after State and Revolution, as together they create a consistent analysis of the major trends of the early 20th Century. Ultimately, I found this to be the ... Read full review

Review: Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism

User Review  - John Mason - Goodreads

As much as I despise the Soviet state that Lenin developed, the material he presents in very familiar, the concentration of capital, both industrial and financial, and the exporting of capital to underdeveloped countries. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION by Doug Lorimer
7
PREFACE TO THE RUSSIAN EDITION
25
Banks and Their New Role
45
Finance Capital and the Financial Oligarchy
58
IMPERIALISM AND THE SPLIT
124
NOTES
137
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Creator of the former Soviet Union, Vladimir Ilich Lenin (family name Ulianov) was born on April 10, 1870 in Simbirsk (later Ulianovsk), Russia, the son of a schools inspector. Lenin received upper class education and obtained a law degree in 1891, but he was moved to oppose the czarist Russian government, partly due to the execution of his brother, Alexander, who had participated in a plot to assassinate the Russian emperor. For taking part in revolutionary activities, Lenin was eventually imprisoned, publishing his work, The Development of Capitalism in Russia, from prison in 1899. Three years later, his pamphlet "What Is to Be Done" became the model for Communist philosophy. Lenin helped the Bolshevist movement that overthrew the czarist government and brought an end to Russia's war against Germany. As head of the new government, he put land in the hands of the peasants and brought industry under government control. An assassination attempt in 1918 wounded him, and two strokes in 1922 forced him to severely curtail government duty. He retreated to his country home in Gorki, where he died on January 21, 1924.

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