Social Democracy and Society: Working Class Radicalism in Düsseldorf, 1890-1920

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 13, 2003 - History - 392 pages
0 Reviews
Social Democracy and Society examines the origins of working-class radicalism in Imperial Germany. The Düsseldorf Social Democratic Party was associated with the left wing of the SPD. It defended theoretical orthodoxy against the onslaughts of revisionism, rejected all cooperation with bourgeois groups, and advocated militant tactics. Professor Nolan argues that the roots of this radicalism extended deep into the Imperial period and sprang from a confrontation between Düsseldorf's working class, which was variously young, highly skilled, migrant, and new to industry, and a political and cultural environment that offered no reformist options. She examines the distinct roles played by peasant workers new to industry, skilled migrant workers, and the indigenous population of Catholic workers. This is the first study to investigate in detail the history of the socialist labor movement in an urban area that was heavily Catholic and to analyze the significance of Catholicism for the political culture of the working class.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The hostile environment Düsseldorf in the 1890s
11
Social democracy and political Catholicism
32
A false start
57
Ideological unity and organizational disarray
76
Ambiguous success and radicalization 19031912
97
Skilled migrants peasant workers and native Catholics
99
Party building and popular culture
126
Expansion and optimism
146
Radicals become revolutionaries 19121920
225
Things fall apart
227
War
251
Revolution
269
Conclusion
301
Statistical tables
308
Notes
315
Bibliography
354

Move to the left
167
The limits of reformism
200

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - this group is not isolated: it has friends, kindred groups, opponents, enemies. The history of any given party can only emerge from the complex portrayal of the totality of society and

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information