The Works of Daniel Defoe, Volume 6

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C. T. Brainard, 1904
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Page 240 - These are the heroes that despise the Dutch And rail at new-come foreigners so much ; Forgetting that themselves are all derived From the most scoundrel race that ever lived...
Page 239 - These in the heralds' register remain, Their noble mean extraction to explain. Yet who the hero was no man can tell, Whether a drummer or a colonel: The silent record blushes to reveal Their undescended dark original.
Page 242 - The royal refugee our breed restores, With foreign courtiers, and with foreign whores : And carefully repeopled us again, Throughout his lazy, long, lascivious reign, With such a blest and true-born English fry, As much illustrates our nobility.
Page 249 - 11 starve themselves and families. An Englishman will fairly drink as much As will maintain two families of Dutch : Subjecting all their labour to their pots ; The greatest artists are the greatest sots. The country poor do by example live ; The gentry lead them, and the clergy drive : What may we not from such examples hope ? The landlord is their god, the priest their pope. A drunken clergy and a swearing bench Has...
Page 245 - A True-Born Englishman's a contradiction, In speech an irony, in fact a fiction; A banter made to be a test of fools, Which those that use it justly ridicules; A metaphor invented to express A man akin to all the universe.
Page 275 - COULD but our ancestors retrieve their fate, And see their offspring thus degenerate ; How we contend for birth and names unknown, And build on their past actions, not our own ; They'd cancel records, and their tombs deface, And openly disown the vile degenerate race : For fame of families is all a cheat, It's personal virtue only makes us great.
Page 296 - If the gallows instead of the Counter, and the galleys instead of the fines, were the reward of going to a conventicle, to preach or hear, there would not be so many sufferers.
Page 286 - The late reign is too fresh in the memory of all the world to need a comment ; how under pretence of joining with the church in redressing some grievances, they pushed things to that extremity, in conjunction with some mistaken gentlemen, as to depose the late king, as if the grievance of the nation could not have been redressed but by the absolute ruin of the prince : here is an instance of their temper, their peace and charity.
Page 32 - I should dream that my money was lost, and start like one frightened ; then, finding it fast in my hand, try to go to sleep again, but could not for a long while, then drop and start again. At last a fancy came into my head, that if I fell asleep, I should dream of the money, and talk of it in my sleep, and tell that I had money ; which if I should do, and one of the rogues should hear me, they would pick it out of my bosom, and of my hand too, without waking me ; and after that thought I could not...
Page 247 - Draymen and porters fill the city Chair And footboys magisterial purple wear. Fate has but very small distinction set Betwixt the counter and the coronet Tarpaulin lords, pages of high renown, Rise up by poor men's valour, not their own. Great families of yesterday we show, And lords whose parents were the Lord knows who.

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