Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 243 pages
Philosophy of Language introduces the student to the main issues and theories in twentieth-century philosophy of language. Topics are structured in three parts in the book. Part I, Reference and Referring Expressions, includes topics such as Russell's Theory of Desciptions, Donnellan's distinction, problems of anaphora, the description theory of proper names, Searle's cluster theory, and the causal-historical theory. Part II, Theories of Meaning, surveys the competing theories of linguistic meaning and compares their various advantages and liabilities. Part III, Pragmatics and Speech Acts, introduces the basic concepts of linguistic pragmatics, includes a detailed discussion of the problem of indirect force and surveys approaches to metaphor.
Unique features of the text:
* chapter overviews and summaries
* clear supportive examples
* study questions
* annotated further reading
* glossary.
 

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The philosophy of language is an interesting subject if you love words, how they work, and the significance of what they signify. Although this book is an introduction to the subject, it should not be ... Read full review

Contents

Overview
xviii
Meaning and understanding
1
The Referential Theory
2
Summary
4
Reference and referring
5
Definite descriptions
7
Overview
8
Singular terms
13
Two Quinean issues
125
Summary
127
Notes
128
TruthCondition Theories Davidsons program
129
Overview
130
Truth conditions
131
Truthdefining natural languages
136
Initial objections
140

Russells Theory of Descriptions
16
Objections to Russells theory
21
Donnellans distinction
26
Anaphora
31
Summary
32
Questions
33
Further reading
34
Proper names the Description Theory
35
Overview
36
Russells Name Claim
37
Opening objections
40
Searles Cluster Theory
42
Kripkes critique
43
Summary
48
Further reading
49
Proper names Direct Reference and the Causal Historical Theory
50
Overview
51
Possible worlds
52
Rigidity and proper names
53
Direct Reference
55
The CausalHistorical Theory
60
Problems for the CausalHistorical Theory
62
Naturalkind terms and Twin Earth
66
Summary
68
Questions
69
Further reading
70
Theories of meaning
73
Traditional theories of meaning
75
Overview
76
Ideational theories
78
The Proposition Theory
80
Summary
86
Questions
87
Use theories
88
Overview
89
Use in a roughly Wittgensteinian sense
90
Objections and some replies
93
Summary
98
Further reading
99
Psychological theories Grices program
100
Overview
101
Grices basic idea
102
Speakermeaning
103
Sentence meaning
108
Summary
113
Further reading
114
Verificationism
115
Overview
116
The theory and its motivation
117
Some objections
119
The big one
124
Summary
146
Questions
147
Further reading
148
TruthCondition Theories possible worlds and intensional semantics
149
Overview
150
Truth conditions reconceived
151
Advantages over Davidsons view
154
Remaining objections
156
Summary
158
Further reading
159
Pragmatics and speech acts
161
Semantic pragmatics
163
Overview
164
Semantic vs pragmatic pragmatics
165
The problem of deixis
166
The work of semantic pragmatics
169
Summary
171
Further reading
172
Speech acts and illocutionary force
173
Overview
174
Performatives
175
Rules and infelicities
176
Force content and perlocution
178
Cohens problem
181
Summary
184
Questions
185
Further reading
186
Implicative relations
187
Overview
188
Conveyed meanings and invited inferences
189
Conversational implicature
191
Presupposition and conventional implicature
195
Indirect force
199
Summary
202
Notes
203
Further reading
204
The dark side
205
Metaphor
207
Overview
208
A philosophical bias
209
The issues and two simple theories
210
The Figurative Simile Theory
214
The Pragmatic Theory
217
Metaphor as analogical
222
Summary
224
Notes
225
Further reading
226
Glossary
227
Bibliography
229
Index
239
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