Roman Architecture

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Cornell University Press, 1983 - Architecture - 288 pages
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Frank Sear traces the evolution of architecture during the four centuries from the late Republic, when Roman building came of age, to A.D. 330, when Constantine moved the empire's capital to Constantinople. More than 200 photographs, maps, and drawings illustrate a discussion ranging over the extent of the empire, from Italy and North Africa and to the European and eastern provinces.Sear elucidates the complex development of Roman architecture by studying in detail the one site he feels to be the most significant and representative of a given period or province and by placing each site in its historical and cultural context. Incorporating the latest archaeological findings, Sear treats much more than stylist innovations; he carefully considers the building methods and materials used by Roman architects and engineers, and he pays close attention to the conditions under which the buildings were erected. This updated edition of Roman Architecture includes a full bibliography.
 

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Contents

Foreword
6
Roman Building Types
29
The Age of Augustus
49
Roman Architects Building Techniques
69
The JulioClaudians
86
Pompeii
103
The Flavians
134
Trajan and Hadrian
154
North Africa
185
The European Provinces
210
The Eastern Provinces
231
The Late Empire
255
Glossary
277
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About the author (1983)

Frank Sear is Professor of Classical Studies, Centre for Classics and Archaeology, University of Melbourne.

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