Clack!

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Page 185 - earth and dust; Who in the dark and silent grave, (When we have wander'd all our ways,) Shuts up the story of our days : But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My GOD shall raise me up, I trust
Page 185 - wander'd all our ways,) Shuts up the story of our days : But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My GOD shall raise me up, I trust I
Page 185 - He was the most fearless of death, that ever was known; and the most resolute and confident, yet with reverence and conscience. When I began to encourage him against the fear of death, he seemed to make so light of it that I wondered at him I
Page 152 - But now of Brutus and his line, with the whole progeny of kings to the entrance of Julius Caesar, we cannot so easily be discharged; descents of ancestry long continued, laws and exploits not plainly seeming to be borrowed or devised, which on the common belief have wrought no small impression, defended by many, denied utterly by few.
Page 186 - him that heathen men had set as little by their lives as he would do, and seemed to die as bravely. He answered that he was persuaded that no man that knew GOD and feared Him could die with cheerfulness and courage, except he were assured of the love and favour of GOD unto him.
Page 185 - found in his Bible in the Gate-house at Westminster." * " Even such is time, that takes on trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who in the dark and silent grave, (When we have wander'd all our ways,) Shuts up the story of our days : But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My GOD shall raise me up, I trust
Page 113 - Beneath the shadow of the cross, As earthly hopes remove, His new commandment Jesus gives, His blessed word of love. 0 bond of union strong and deep ! 0 bond of perfect peace ! Not e'en the lifted cross can harm, If we
Page 100 - a goodlie sight of hunters with full crie of a kennel of hounds, Mercuric and Iris descending and ascending from and to an high place, the tempest wherein it hailed small confects, rained rosewater, and snew an artificial! kind of snow, all strange, maruellous, and abundant.
Page 48 - Underneath this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sydney's sister, Pembroke's mother ! Death, ere thou hast slain another Fair and learned and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee
Page 152 - of something true, as what we read in poets of the Flood and Giants, little believed till undoubted witnesses taught us that all was not feigned; I have therefore determined to bestow the telling over even of these reputed tales, be it for nothing else but in favour of our English poets and rhetoricians, who by their art will know how to use them

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