Posthumous Works: Containing, Sermons, on Several Subjects, Viz. On the martyrdom of King Charles I.. Ecclesiastical constitutions to be strictly maintain'd. The certainty of a judgment after this life. An account of his travels into Poland .... Memoirs of his life and writings. ... His last will and testament, Volume 6

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E. Curll, 1717
 

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Page 16 - All things come alike to all: there is one event to the righteous, and to the wicked; to the good and to the clean, and to the unclean; to him that sacrificeth, and to him that sacrificeth not: as is the good, so is the sinner; and he that sweareth, as he that feareth an oath...
Page 15 - Oh ! the depth of the riches, both of the wifdom and knowledge of God ! How unfearchable are his judgments, and his ways paft finding out ! For who hath known the mind of the Lord ? or who hath been hiscounfellor?
Page 12 - Then said he unto them, Therefore every scribe which is instructed unto the kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, .which bringeth forth out of his treasure things new and old.
Page 129 - A dean and prebendary Had once a new vagary, And were at doubtful strife, sir, Who led the better life, sir, And was the better man, And was the better man. The dean he said, that truly, Since Bluff was so unruly, He'd prove it to his face, sir, That he had the most grace, sir, And so the fight began, &c.
Page 143 - ... but retaining their guilt : what is it then that can promise him a fair passage into the other world, or a comfortable appearance before his dreadful Judge when he is there ? not all the friends and interests, all the riches and honours under heaven, can speak so much as a word for him, or one word of comfort to him in that condition ; they may possibly reproach, but they cannot relieve him. ' No ; at this disconsolate time, when the busy tempter shall be more than usually apt...
Page 108 - Masaniello, a poor fisherman, with his red cap and his angle, could have reckoned it possible to see such a pitiful thing, within a week after, shining in his cloth of gold, and with a word or a nod absolutely commanding the whole city of Naples ? And who that had beheld such a bankrupt beggarly fellow as Cromwell first entering the...
Page 114 - During the reign of James, he spent most of his time in privacy : he could not tolerate the encroachments that were made on the rights of the national church, and yet his creed taught him " to abide by his allegiance, and use no other weapons but prayers and tears for the recovery of his sovereign from the wicked and unadvised counsels wherewith he was entangled.
Page 25 - ... and a waistcoat under that, of the same length, tied close about the waist with a girdle. He never wears any gloves; and this long coat is of strong scarlet cloth, lined in the winter with rich fur, but in summer only with silk. Instead of shoes, he always wears, both abroad and at home...
Page 127 - Andfo Ttake my leave of the " Dean's three AifiinH infinite Minds, Spirits, or Sub" fiances, that is to fay, of his three Gods ; and having " done this, methinks I fee him go whimpering " away with his Finger in his Eye, and the Com...
Page 141 - Arijlotle, with all the beautiful Lights, Graces, and Embellifhments of Cicero. One does not know which to admire moft in his Writings, the Strength of Reafon, Force of Stile, or Brightnefs of Imagination.

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