Aristotle for Everybody

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jun 1, 1997 - Philosophy - 288 pages
7 Reviews
Adler instructs the world in the "uncommon common sense" of Aristotelian logic, presenting Aristotle's understandings in a current, delightfully lucid way.

Aristotle (384 - 322 B.C.) taught logic to Alexander the Great and, by virtue of his philosophical works, to every philosopher since, from Marcus Aurelius, to Thomas Aquinas, to Mortimer J. Adler. Now Adler instructs the world in the "uncommon common sense" of Aristotelian logic, presenting Aristotle's understandings in a current, delightfully lucid way. He brings Aristotle's work to an everyday level. By encouraging readers to think philosophically, Adler offers us a unique path to personal insights and understanding of intangibles, such as the difference between wants and needs, the proper way to pursue happiness, and the right plan for a good life.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lente - LibraryThing

For everybody? Even a child can understand? No. It seems ironic to me that many people seem to think this book is too simple to understand. I think it suffers from the opposite problem. If you are not ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jimocracy - LibraryThing

There was nothing that really blew me away about this book and nothing that was especially upsetting. It was mediocre in content and scope. The narration was a bit stuffy and that might have been a stumbling block for me. Read full review

Contents

Man the Philosophical Animal
3
Man the Doer
67
Man the Knower
127
Difficult Philosophical Questions
169
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About the author (1997)

Dr. Mortimer J. Adler was Chairman of the Board of the Encyclopedia Britannica, Director of the Institute for Philosophical Research, Honorary Trustee of the Aspen Institute, and authored more than fifty books. He died in 2001.

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