Ladies and Gentlemen

Front Cover
Random House, Jan 5, 2012 - Fiction - 256 pages
6 Reviews

A hotshot young lawyer, burdened by years of guilt and resentment, comes to the aid of his irresponsible kid brother, only to realise he's a pawn in a treacherous scheme. A lonely professor, frequently regaled with outrageous tales by the office handyman, suddenly fears he's being asked to abet a murderous fugitive. A man down on his luck closes in on a mysterious job offer while doing a good turn for his fragile neighbour, but his efforts backfire in a terrifically surreal - and hilarious - manner. Four college kids goad each other on in a series of escalating dares, culminating in a result as ambiguous as it is tragic. An enterprising adolescence uses his brief career as a child actor to fulfil the crush he has on a friend's seemingly untouchable older sister.

Laced throughout with glimmers of redemption and a refreshing combination of warmth and cynicism, these noirish narratives have a youthful energy that belies their hard-won wisdom, and together they showcase one of our most outstanding new writers.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
4
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - alexrichman - LibraryThing

An excellent book, reminiscent of Raymond Carver's seminal collection about how we live and love. Almost every character could narrate their own novel - and I can't wait for Ross's next one. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nivramkoorb - LibraryThing

I read "Mr Peanut" so I looked forward to reading this new collection of short stories. Ross shows the dark side in these stories but they are incredibly creative and unique. I enjoyed the ambiguity ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2012)

Adam Ross was born in New York and studied writing with William Gass and Stanley Elkin. He worked as a journalist and teacher but now writes full-time and lives with his wife and two daughters in Nashville, Tennessee. His first novel, Mr. Peanut, was published by Jonathan Cape in 2010.

Bibliographic information