Just So Stories

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Doubleday Page, 1912 - Animals - 249 pages
100 Reviews
Twelve stories about animals and insects including How the Camel Got His Hump; How the First Letter was Written, and How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin.
 

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User Review  - Stahl-Ricco - LibraryThing

Okay, I know that there is a racist element to this book, which I agree is terrible and hard to understand. That being said, I did like the stories and I enjoyed sharing them with my daughter. They ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

Done in the style of fables, but about the length of traditional fairy tales (think Grimm or Perrault). The animals in the fables encompass creatures from all over the world (India, Africa, Amazon off ... Read full review

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Page 23 - We get the hump — Cameelious hump — The hump that is black and blue ! We climb out of bed with a frouzly head And a snarly-yarly voice. We shiver and scowl and we grunt and we growl At our bath and our boots and our toys ; And there ought to be a corner for me (And I know there is one for you) When we get the hump — Cameelious hump — The hump that is black and blue...
Page 79 - I KEEP six honest serving-men (They taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When And How and Where and Who.
Page 196 - Cat grew very angry and said, "Has Wild Dog told tales of me?" Then the Woman laughed and said, "You are the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to you. You are neither a friend nor a servant. You have said it yourself. Go away and walk by yourself in all places alike.
Page 215 - I am in the Cave for always and always and always; but still I am the Cat who walks by himself, and all places are alike to me.
Page 165 - In mocassins and deer-skin cloak, Unfearing, free and fair she flits, And lights her little damp-wood smoke To show her Daddy where she flits. For far — oh, very far behind, So far she cannot call to him, Comes Tegumai alone to find The daughter that was all to him.
Page 216 - He will kill mice and he will be kind to Babies when he is in the house, just as long as they do not pull his tail too hard. But when he has done that, and between times, and when the moon gets up and night comes, he is the Cat that walks by himself, and all places are alike to him.
Page 212 - Cave, as long as he does not pull my tail too hard, for always and always and always. But still I am the Cat that walks by himself, and all places are alike to me.
Page 64 - and I'll whisper.' Then the Elephant's Child put his head down close to the Crocodile's musky, tusky mouth, and the Crocodile caught him by his little nose, which up to that very week, day, hour, and minute, had been no bigger than a boot, though much more useful. 'I think...
Page 139 - There runs a road by Merrow Down — A grassy track to-day it is — An hour out of Guildford town, Above the river Wey it is. Here, when they heard the horse-bells ring, The ancient Britons dressed and rode To watch the dark Phoenicians bring Their goods along the Western Road.

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