Recollections of the early settlement of the Wabash Valley

Front Cover
Courier Steam Book and Job Print. House, 1860 - Frontier and pioneer life - 160 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - The land sales commenced here to-day, and the town is full of strangers. The eastern and southern portions of the State are strongly represented, as well as Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania. There is but little bidding against each other. The settlers, or " squatters," as they are called by speculators, have arranged matters among themselves to their general satisfaction.
Page 22 - An Act for the formation of a new county out of the county of Wabash, and for establishing the county seat thereof...
Page 125 - ITolman was taken back to Wa-puc-canat-ta, where he remained the most of the time during his captivity. Rue was taken first to the Mississinnewa, then to the Wabash towns. Two years of his eventful captivity were spent .in that region of country watered by the Wabash and Illinois rivers and their tributaries. He gave accurate descriptions of many localities along these rivers after a lapse of over fifty years. The mouth of Tippecanoe River ; the Wea Town, and Prairie ; Black Rock ; the mouth of Big...
Page 93 - Wabash, and who enjoyed during his long and prosperous career in public life, the respect and confidence of all who knew him. He was a...
Page 76 - Schools of fishes — salmon, bass, red-horse, and pike — swam close along the shore, catching at the blossoms of the red-bud and plum that floated on the surface of the water, which was so clear that myriads of the finny tribe could be seen darting hither and thither amidst the limpid element, turning up their silvery sides as they sped out into deeper water.
Page 20 - Or from ten to thirty miles to mill, and wait there three or four days and nights for your grist, as many had to do in the first settlement of this country! Such things were of frequent occurrence then, and there was but little grumbling about it. It was a grand sight to see the log heaps and brush piles burning in the night on a clearing of ten or fifteen acres — a Democratic torchlight procession, or a midnight march of the Sons of Malta, with their Grand...
Page 19 - I was there myself. We cleared land, rolled logs, and burned brush, blazed out paths from one neighbor's cabin to another, and from one settlement to another — made and used handmills and hominy mortars — hunted deer, turkies, otter, and raccoons — caught fish, dug ginseng, hunted bees, and the like, and — lived on the fat of the laud. We read of a-land of "corn and wine...
Page 36 - ... leaning on their guns, some on their sticks, a yard in advance of the line, and others as far in the rear. The captain's dander rose. He threw his cocked hat, feather and all, on the ground, took off his red sash and hunting shirt, and threw them with his sword upon his hat. He then rolled up hia sleeves, and shouted with the voice of a stentor: "Gentlemen! form a line, and keep it, or I will thrash the whole company!
Page 96 - Scott, with nine companies of artillery, hastened from the seaboard, by way of the lakes, to Chicago...
Page 77 - The lines all crurged simultaneously towards the center, on horseback, with dogs, guns and clubs, thus completely investing whatever game was within the lines, and scaring it from the advancing lines toward the center where the excitement of the chase was greatly heightened, and the greatest carnage ensued. Often from two to ten wolves and as many deer were taken in a day at these hunts, and wild cats, foxes and catamounts in abundance. Horses and dogs...

Bibliographic information