Dialogue on Ancient and Modern Music

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Yale University Press, 2003 - Music - 390 pages
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Vincenzo Galilei, the father of the astronomer Galileo, was a guiding light of the Florentine Camerata. His Dialogue on Ancient and Modern Music, published in 1581 or 1582 and here translated into English, was among the most influential music treatises of his era.
 

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Contents

Foreword by Thomas J Mathiesen
xv
Dialogue 6
lxi
THE TUNING QUESTION
10
What Is a Limma
23
How Many Commas Are Contained in a Major and Minor Tone and Major
28
The Trihemitone
36
The Tritone
42
Current Names of Intervals
48
Misunderstanding of Modern Contrapuntists
185
Other Misunderstandings of the Moderns
191
CRITIQUE OF COUNTERPOINT
197
What Contrary Motion Is Good For
203
What the Rules and Constraints of the Contrapuntists Are Good For
212
That Part of Music Expected of Artifical Instruments Is Also Corrupted
218
From Whom May Modern Practitioners Learn the Imitation of the Words
224
Four Ancient Songs
238

The Major Sixth
55
The Major Seventh
62
la sol re Is Higher by Hard b than by Soft b
72
Species of Tuning Played by Stringed Instruments
78
What Pythagoras Did and Did Not Appreciate
84
From What the Following Imperfection Arises
87
How They Sang in His Time
93
Where Todays Method of Singing Originated
99
Why Aristoxenus Divided the Diatessaron into Sixty Parts
105
Reflections of the Author
113
Method of Dividing the Ancient Enharmonic Monochord
119
Reflection of the Author
125
The Fifths and Fourths Are Altered in the Tunings of Aristoxenus
131
THE ANCIENT AND MODERN TONAL SYSTEMS
135
Tonoi According to Ptolemy
141
By How Many Names Was the Greek Lyre Known
147
Which Harmoniai the Chorus of the Tragedy Used
153
How the Ditones and Semiditones Are Involved in the Tonoi
160
Reflections of the Author Concerning Musical Intervals
166
Harmonic and Arithmetic Division Has Nothing to Do with the Modern
172
Why the Harmonic Division Pleases More than the Arithmetic
178
How a Kitharode Was Different from a Kitharist
244
How the Chorus Managed to Stay Together When Singing
251
Whether Each Tonos Was Suited to Express Any Affection
252
Whether a Genre Used Simply Can Have a Good Effect
258
Ptolemy Refutes Many Praiseworthy Ancient Musicians
265
Whether New Distributions Are Possible
275
Toroebus of Lydia Adds a Fifth String to the Lyre
281
Lycaon of Samos Added the Eighth String to the Lyre
287
Histiaeus of Colophon Added the Tenth String to the Kithara and Timotheus
290
ANCIENT AND MODERN INSTRUMENTS
305
Stringed Instruments of the Ancients Did Not Have Frets
314
How Sound Is Made
327
What Steps Are Meant by Hypate and Nete
334
Opinion of Some Moderns Refuted by the Author
340
Reflection by the Author
346
Another Sort of Performer
347
Why Cornetti and Trombones Were Introduced
353
What the Term Organ Means
361
Whence the Lute Came to Us
367
The Vice of Ignorance
371
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Vincenzo Galilei, the father of the astronomer Galileo, was a guiding light of the Florentine Camerata. His Dialogue on Ancient and Modern Music, published in 1581 or 1582 and now translated into English for the first time, was among the most influential music treatises of his era.

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