On the correlation of physical forces, the substance of a course of lectures, Volume 1

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Page 44 - I think, be evident from the previous parts of this essay, to be that of a necessary reciprocal production ; in other words, that any force capable of producing another may, in its turn, be produced by it — nay, more, can be itself resisted by the force it produces, in proportion to the energy of such production, as action is ever accompanied and resisted by reaction...
Page 19 - CErsted proved that Electricity and Magnetism are two forces which act upon each other; not in straight lines, as all other known forces do, but in a rectangular direction : that is, that bodies invested with electricity, or the conduits of an electric-current, tend to place magnets at right angles to them ; and, conversely, that magnets tend to place bodies conducting electricity at right angles to them The discovery of...
Page 14 - In the decompositions and compositions which the terminal points proceeding from the conductors of an electrical machine develope when immersed in different chemical media, we get the production of chemical affinity by electricity, of which motion is the initial source. Lastly, motion may be again reproduced by the forces which have emanated from motion; thus, the divergence of the electrometer, the revolution of the electrical wheel, the deflection of the magnetic needle, are, when resulting from...
Page 20 - CErsted, by which electricity was made a source of Magnetism, soon led philosophers to seek the converse effect ; that is, to educe Electricity from a permanent magnet : — had these experimentalists succeeded in their expectations of making a stationary magnet a source of electric-currents, they would have realised the ancient dreams of perpetual motion, they would have converted statics into dynamics, they would have produced power without expenditure ; in other words, they would have become creators....
Page 7 - The position which I seek to establish in this Essay is, that the various affections of matter which constitute the main objects of experimental physics, viz., heat, light, electricity, magnetism, chemical affinity, and motion, are all correlative, or have a reciprocal dependence ; that neither, taken abstractedly...
Page 27 - ... generate which three heterogeneous substances are always necessary : Induced by this belief I made some experiments on the subject, and succeeded in forming a voltaic combination by gaseous-oxygen, gaseous-hydrogen, and platinum ; by which a galvanometer was deflected and water decomposed It appears to me that heat and light may be considered as affections ; or, according to the Undulatory-theory, vibrations of matter itself, and not of a distinct ethereal fluid permeating it : these vibrations...
Page 4 - ... by which, when discovered, transparency could be produced or superinduced. To take a specific example of what I may term the synthetic application of his philosophy. " In gold there meet together yellowness, gravity, malleability, fixedness in the fire, a particular manner of flowing in the fire, a determinate way of solution, which...
Page 30 - Although this theory has been considered defective by a philosopher of high repute, I cannot see the force of the arguments by which it has been assailed ; and therefore, for the present, though with diffidence, I still adhere to it. The fact itself of the correlation of the different modes of force is to my mind a very cogent argument in favour of their being affections of the same matter; and though electricity, magnetism, and heat might be viewed as produced by undulations of the same ether as...
Page 28 - A prepared daguerreotype plate is enclosed in a box filled with water, having a glass front with a shutter over it. Between this glass and the plate is a gridiron of silver wire ; the plate is connected...
Page 28 - ... precipitated : by this decomposition the colour of the substance changes from white to blue. If now, paper be impregnated with chloride of silver, which can be done by a simple chemical process, then partially covered with an opaque substance, a leaf for example, and exposed to a strong light, the chloride will be decomposed in all those parts of the paper where the light is not intercepted, and we shall have, by the action of light, a white image of the leaf on a purple ground : if similar paper...

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