The Overthrow of Allende and the Politics of Chile, 1964-1976

Front Cover
University of Pittsburgh Pre, Jun 15, 1977 - History - 344 pages
Paul Sigmund, who has studied Chile for more than a decade, and lived and taught there, offers an exhaustive, balanced analysis of the overthrow of Salvador Allende, and why it occurred. Sigmund examines the Allende government, the Frei government that preceeded it, the coup that ended it, and the Pinochet government that succeeded it. He also views the roles of various Chilean political and interest groups, the CIA, and U.S. corporations.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 The Coup and Its Causes
3
2 The Context of Chilean Politics
14
3 The Revolution in Liberty
23
4 The Frei Revolution Stalls
57
5 The Emergence of the 1970 Candidates
77
6 The 1970 Presidential Election
92
The Illusion of Success
128
8 Polarization and Brinkmanship
161
9 The Politicization of the Military
188
10 Prelude to the Coup
202
11 The Overthrow of Allende
231
12 Chiles New Order
248
13 The Lessons of Chile
275
Notes
295
Index
321
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1977)

Paul E. Sigmund is professor of politics at Princeton University.

Bibliographic information