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Shaped by their ambition, he will discover his own.
In the year 10,000 mankind has forged a galactic empire spanning more than a hundred worlds; all bound together through a mysterious substance
known as the spice, which is found on only one world, Arrakis. The spice grants a variety of powers, including, for a select few, the ability to fold space. On Caladaan, House Atreides prepares to take control of Arrakis, all the while secret forces gather, waiting for their opportunity. Some have waited years, others, generations, but on Arrakis, all will come together, their plans hinging on the Atreides heir, and his hidden potential.
While epic in scope, the story grounds itself in the immediacy of its characters. Told in a third omniscient point of view, the story cuts from one perspective to the next within each scene, allowing audiences to share in the inner thoughts of every major character. A large cast is introduced gradually, bringing characters together in ever shifting groups of two or three, relying on their complex relationships to reveal different aspects of each character, as their goals come together to shape the plot of the chapter.
The diverse perspectives allow audiences to explore various questions on the nature and relativity of morality, humanity, and the social pressures communities often apply to their members, pressuring individuals to conform to the wishes of the whole.
At the same time these diverse perspectives, combined with an emphasis on scene driven goals, bring the novel closer to an anthology, as each chapter switches to a new perspective, each one recasting characters as heroes and villains. The ambiguity of it all raises some very interesting questions, but robs the audience of a clear catharsis, as even the protagonist comes to regard his actions with regret. A powerful story that challenges the audience to reconsider many of the simple truths they cling to.
+Strong Characters
+Strong Ideas
+Strong Setting
*Complex but familiar plot
*Challenging Writing
4.5/5
 

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The very pinnacle of science-fiction, besting all other competitors. Though some may claim the lack of continual action and the introspective style detract from the book's quality, these features only serve to make it distinct amongst other novels. The ecological focus of the hard science in the book makes it unique and enjoyable, while the unusual political structure make it a good study for those interested by politics. The cast is diverse and far more insight is given with their characters than those of other books. Through their thoughts the innuendos made by them are suddenly made accessible and ready for analyzation. The true quality of this book, however, lies not solely in the fantastical technologies nor the characters, but also in the wondrous quality of being able to read it many times over and find new, subtle information each time. 

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Set more than 21,000 years in the future, Dune won the first Nebula Award and shared the Hugo Award. As to language, the “d” and “h” words are found frequently, the term “a**” is used of a person’s rear end, someone is called “lizard turd,” a little bawdy humor occurs, and there are some oblique references to sex but nothing openly vulgar or obscene. Concubines are mentioned several times. Jessica is the Duke’s concubine and only woman though they have never officially married. Paul keeps his Fremen wife as a concubine and his only woman though he officially marries the Emperor’s daughter. The Baron is definitely portrayed as a homosexual, although the LGBT crowd has complained that the book’s only portrayal of a homosexual character, the vile pervert Baron Harkonnen, is negative. According to the Afterword, Dune is a modern-day conglomeration of familiar myths, has words and names from many tongues, and is based on themes found in a variety of religious faiths. I noticed concepts drawn from Islam, Judaism, and even Christianity. Early in his newspaper career, Herbert was introduced to Zen by two Jungian psychologists, and throughout the Dune series Herbert employs concepts and forms borrowed from Zen Buddhism. In spite of these things about the book that I didn’t really care for, I generally enjoyed the story. 

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a great book indeed a amazing book a great book all around

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Best
This series is the greatest. Why is it so expensive on here?

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Best book ever written!!!
I first read this book when I was 12 and it forever changed my life. The human experience will not be complete until you have read this book. Read it!!!!

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Simply the best

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Summer Reading
This was one of my high school's summer reading books, and unlike the others I had to read this book captivated my attention. I found that it reminded me of Shakespeare in the diverse
plot and the amount of characters. It was a little hard to follow in the beginning, but once you get into it you can't put it down. 

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Some herald this book as the greatest in the Science Fiction genera. I agree.

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