Myths and Legends of the New York State Iroquois, Issues 125-129

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University of the State of New York, 1908 - Indians of North America - 195 pages
 

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Page 180 - WE WAIT IN THE DARKNESS! COME, ALL YE WHO LISTEN, HELP IN OUR NIGHT JOURNEY: NOW NO SUN IS SHINING; NOW NO STAR IS GLOWING; COME SHOW us THE PATHWAY: THE NIGHT IS NOT FRIENDLY; SHE CLOSES HER EYELIDS; THE MOON HAS FORGOT US, WE WAIT IN THE DARKNESS. Darkness Song...
Page 144 - Englishmen, which the Indians manage with a Nail stuck in a Cane or Reed. Thus they roll it continually on their Thighs, with their Right-Hand holding the Bit of Shell with their Left, so in time they drill a Hole quite through it, which is a very tedious Work; but especially in making their Ronoak, four of which will scarce make one Length of Wampum.
Page 33 - and will grow fast. Who will bear it?" The Turtle was willing, and the oeh-da was placed on his hard shell. Having received a resting place for the light, the water birds, guided by its glow, flew upward, and receiving the woman on their widespread wings, bore her down to the Turtle's back. And Hah-nu-nah, the Turtle, became the Earth Bearer. When he stirs, the seas rise in great waves, and when restless and violent, earthquakes yawn and devour.
Page 129 - If you tie up the clothes of an orphan child, the Great Spirit will notice it, and reward you for it.
Page 144 - An Englishman could not afford to make so much of this wampum for five or ten times the value ; for it is made out of a vast great shell, of which that country affords plenty; where it is ground smaller than the small end of a tobacco pipe, or a large wheat straw.
Page 150 - ... that they might not steal the corn sprouts at the next planting. He fed the fish and water animals with entrails and offal. No ruthless hunter was he but thoughtful. He threw tobacco for the animals in the woods and water and made incense for them with the oyenkwaon'we', the sacred tobacco, and "threw it" even for the trees. He was a well loved chief for he remembered his friends and gave them meat. All the animals were his friends and all his people were loyal to him. All this was because he...
Page 124 - Iroquois were found in the possession of the same territories between the Hudson and the Genesee rivers, upon which they afterwards continued to reside until near the close of the eighteenth century. At that time, the Five Nations, into which they had become subdivided, were united in a League ; but its formation was subsequent to their establishment in the terri4 tones out of which the state of New York has since been erected.
Page 124 - they resided in the vicinity of Montreal, upon the northern bank of the St. Lawrence, where they lived in subjection to the Adirondacks, a branch of the Algonkin race, then in possession of the whole country north of that river. At that time the Iroquois were but one nation, and few in number. From the Adirondacks they learned the art of husbandry, and while associated with them became inured to the hardships of the chase. After they had multiplied...
Page 38 - When the east wind blows chill with its rain, 'The Moose is spreading his breath'; and when the south wind wafts soft breezes, 'The Fawn is returning to its Doe.'" Four is the magic number in all Indian lore; fundamentally it represents the square of the directions, by which the creator measured out his work. VI. THE POWERS ABOVE Even greater than the Wind Giant is the...