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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on My view was that every executive officer, and above all every executive officer in....
" My view was that every executive officer, and above all every executive officer in high position, was a steward of the people, bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative merit of keeping... "
Theodore Roosevelt, an Autobiography - Page 389
by Theodore Roosevelt - 1913 - 597 pages
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Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society Held at ..., Volume 60

Electronic journals - 1921
...President Roosevelt affirmed belief in the same doctrine over a century later in his autobiography :19 "I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively...not be done by the President unless he could find somespecific authorization to do it. My belief was that it was not only his right but his duty to do...
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The Presidency, Its Duties, Its Powers, Its Opportunities and Its ...

William Howard Taft - Executive power - 1916 - 145 pages
...position, was a steward of the people, bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people and not to content himself with the negative...talents undamaged in a napkin. I declined to adopt this view that what was imperatively necessary for the nation could not be done by the President unless...
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The Constitutional Review, Volumes 1-2

Henry Campbell Black - Constitutional law - 1917
...enumerated. No one else went so far as this until President Roosevelt, who says in his autobiography : "I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively...unless he could find some specific authorization to do 62 63 it. My belief was that it was not only his right but his duty to do anything that the needs of...
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The Relation of the Executive Power to Legislation

Henry Campbell Black - Executive power - 1919 - 191 pages
...position, was a steward of the people, bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...nation could not be done by the President unless he coyld find some specific authorization to do it. My belief was that it was not only his right but his...
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Theodore Roosevelt and His Time Shown in His Own Letters, Volume 1

Joseph Bucklin Bishop - United States - 1920
...high position, was a steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin. I decline to adopt the view that what was imperatively necessary for the Nation could not be done by...
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The Constitutional Review, Volume 2

Constitutional law - 1918
...enumerated. No one else went so far aŤ this until President Roosevelt, who says in his autobiography : "I declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively necessary for the nation could not be clone by the President unless he could find some specific authorization to do 62 63 it. My belief was...
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The World's Work, Volume 40

Walter Hines Page, Arthur W. Page - History, Modern - 1920
...position, was a steward of the people, bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin. 1 declined to adopt the view that what was imperatively necessary for the nation could not be done...
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Quarterly Review of the Michigan Alumnus, Volume 65

1958
...high position, was a steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin." The requirements of presidential leadership are severe. The unrivalled platform of the office imposes...
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Seeing American Foreign Policy Whole

Brewster C. Denny - United States - 1985 - 200 pages
...presidency as a "steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative...merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin." 2 If the activist President has become the norm, such presidents now rely on a modern and generously...
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The Presidential Campaign: An Essay

Stephen Hess - Political Science - 2010 - 134 pages
...president] . . . was a steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin."37 Indeed, given the Rooseveltian way of doing the president's business, Bryce's 1910 edition...
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