A Life of Socrates

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Taylor and Walton, 1840 - 155 pages
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Page xiii - Socrates autem primus philosophiam devocavit e coelo, et in urbibus collocavit, et in domos etiam introduxit, et coegit de vita, et moribus, rebusque bonis et malis quaerere.
Page lix - ... implicate as many in their crimes as they could. Then I, however, showed again, by action, not in word only, that I did not care a whit for death if that be not too rude an expression, but that I did care with all my might not to do anything unjust or unholy. For that government, with all its power, did not frighten me into doing anything unjust...
Page cxlvi - ... one whole. For his proofs always hinge on this assumption : that it is impossible to start from one true thought, and to be entangled in a contradiction with any other, and also that knowledge derived from any one point, and obtained by correct combination, cannot contradict that which has been deduced in like manner from any other point ; and while he exposed such contradictions in the current conceptions of mankind, he strove to rouse those leading ideas in all who were capable of understanding...
Page cxvii - ... might be innocently adopted. The observation attributed to him in one of Plato's early works seems to throw great light on the nature and extent of his conformity to the State religion. Being asked whether he believes the Attic legend of Boreas and Orithuia, he replies that he should indeed only be following the example of many ingenious men if he rejected it and attempted to explain it away ; but that such speculations, however fine, appeared to him to betoken a mind not very happily constituted...
Page lxxv - Plato, furnish a striking instance of how imperfect knowledge leads to injustice and calumnies, and commonplace stale declamations. It shows an unexampled degree of noble-mindedness in the nation, that the heated temper of a fluctuating popular assembly, produced so few reprehensible...
Page xcix - Aristophanes which appear to have been placed by recent investigations beyond doubt. It may be considered as certain that he was not animated by any personal malevolence toward Socrates, but only attacked him as an enemy and corrupter of religion and morals ; but, on the other hand, it is equally well established that he did not merely borrow the name of Socrates for the representative of the sophistical school, but designed to point the attention and to excite the feelings of his audience against...
Page cxlvi - if he went about in the service of the god, to justify the celebrated oracle, it is impossible that the utmost point he reached could have been simply to know that he knew nothing ; there was a step beyond this which he must have taken, that of knowing what knowledge is. For by what other means could he have been enabled to declare that which others believed themselves to know to be no knowledge, than by a more correct conception of knowledge, and by a more correct method founded upon that conception?...
Page lii - He laid every thing before the assembly of the people, put the question to the vote, examined the votes, and, in short, conducted the whole business of the assembly. He enjoyed this power, however, only for a single day ; for that day he was intrusted with the keys of the citadel and the treasury of the republic.
Page cli - For how could he have said so generally, that the things which depend on God ought not to be made the subject of inquiry, before those which depend on man have been despatched, since not only are the latter connected in a variety of ways with the former, but even among things human there must be some of greater moment, others of less, some of nearer, others of more remote concern, and the proposition would lead to the conclusion that before one was brought to its completion, not even the investigation...

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