Going Solo

Front Cover
Penguin, 2008 - Authors, English - 209 pages
27 Reviews
Roald Dahl's Going Solois the marvellous account of his life as a young man. He describes getting his first job in Africa and his wartime exploits as an RAF fighter pilot, where he was shot down in the Libyan desert. Continuing the story he began in Boy, the first part of his memoir, the master storyteller conjures up a real-life world as magical and unnerving as any he writes about in his fiction.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SarahGraceGrzy - www.librarything.com

3.5 stars. First off, I am once again shocked that this is considered juvenile fiction. I could see this being for the older range of juvenile fiction (15-18), but I would NOT give this to my little ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - themulhern - LibraryThing

A sequel to Dahl's "Boy". Something of the same tone, but far grimmer, since it is set before and during WWII. Not entirely true, by any means, just like "Boy", but quite as interesting. Dahl was a photography enthusiast, and the book is illustrated with his own photographs. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

When he was at school Roald Dahl received terrible reports for his writing - with one teacher actually writing in his report, 'I have never met a boy who so persistently writes the exact opposite of what he means. He seems incapable of marshalling his thoughts on paper!' After finishing school Roald Dahl, in search of adventure, travelled to East Africa to work for a company called Shell. In Africa he learnt to speak Swahili, drove from diamond mines to gold mines, and survived a bout of malaria where his temperature reached 105.5 degrees (that's very high!). With the outbreak of the Second World War Roald Dahl joined the RAF. But being nearly two metres tall he found himself squashed into his fighter plane, knees around his ears and head jutting forward. Tragically of the 20 men in his squadron, Roald Dahl was one of only three to survive. Roald wrote about these experiences in his books Boyand Going Solo. Later in the war Roald Dahl was sent to America. It was there that he met famous author C.S. Forester (author of the Captain Hornblower series) who asked the young pilot to write down his war experiences for a story he was writing. Forester was amazed by the result, telling Roald 'I'm bowled over. Your piece is marvellous. It is the work of a gifted writer. I didn't touch a word of it.' (an opinion which would have been news to Roald's early teachers!). Fore

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