Cultural Representation in Native America

Front Cover
Andrew Jolivétte
Rowman Altamira, 2006 - History - 205 pages
Today as in the past there are many cultural and commercial representations of American Indians that, thoughtlessly or otherwise, negatively shape the images of indigenous people. Jolivétte and his co-authors challenge and contest these images, demonstrating how Native representation and identity are at the heart of Native politics and Native activism. In portrayals of a Native Barbie Doll or a racist mascot, disrespect of Native women, misconceptions of mixed race identities, or the commodification of all things "Indian", the authors reveal how the very existence of Native people continues to be challenged, with harmful repercussions in social and legal policy, not just in popular culture. The authors re-articulate Native history, religion, identity, and oral and literary traditions in ways that allow the true identity and persona of the Native person to be recognized and respected. It is a project that is fundamental to ethnic revitalization and the recognition of indigenous rights in North America. This book is a provocative and essential introduction for students and Native and non-Native people who wish to understand the images and realities of American Indian lifeways in American society.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Say Hau to Native American Barbie 27
27
Liquor Moccasins
38
Masks in the New Millennium
61
Contestation and Politics
77
Salt Songs
96
In the Spirit of Crazy Horse
111
Contestation and MixedRace Identity
119
MixedBlood
131
Playing Indian
139
Examining the Regional and Multigenerational
159
Index
189
About the Contributors
201
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Andrew Jolivette teaches in the American Indian studies and in the Ethnic Studies program at San Francisco University.

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