Oman and the World: The Emergence of an Independent Foreign Policy

Front Cover
Rand Corporation, 1995 - History - 409 pages
In July 1970, amid vast turmoil throughout the Persian Gulf region, Qaboos bin Sa'id led a successful coup against his father and proclaimed himself the new Head of State. Sultan Qaboos promised to institute a modern, efficient, and just government and to establish friendly relations with neighboring countries. Facing significant internal challenges to his authority, Qaboos restored internal order through effective military and economic measures. Simultaneously, he adopted long-term principles that facilitated the introduction of capable foreign policy initiatives, based on nonintervention in the affairs of other countries, respect for international law, and nonalignment. Today, the Sultanate of Oman remains stable--its foreign policy flexible by nature, its regional preeminence assured. This report systematically analyzes the foreign policy of the Sultanate. It traces the origins of the Omani nation-state, identifies trends in Omani diplomacy, and examines the Sultanate's foreign policy in the modern era, focusing on relations with states on the Arabian Peninsula and in the Persian Gulf region, with the West, and around the world.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

OMAN & THE WORLD

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The Sultanate of Oman is one of the least-studied countries in the Persian Gulf. This book by an associate political scientist at The Rand Corp. and a keen observer of recent developments in the Gulf ... Read full review

Oman and the world: the emergence of an independent foreign policy

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The Sultanate of Oman is one of the least-studied countries in the Persian Gulf. This book by an associate political scientist at The Rand Corp. and a keen observer of recent developments in the Gulf ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Oman and the Persian Gulf Before 1970
3
Oman and the Persian Gulf in 1970
6
Oman and the Persian Gulf After 1970
8
The Emergence of an Independent Foreign Policy
11
THE OMANI NATION
17
THE FIRST IMAMATE 7201719
24
THE IMPERIAL AGE 17191868
28
Oman and the Russian Republic
174
OMAN AND THE POSTSOVIET STATES
175
KYRGYZSTAN
177
TAJIKISTAN
178
AZERBAIJAN
179
ARMENIA
180
OMAN AND THE FAR EAST
185
China and the 1957 Uprising in the Dhufar
187

THE SECOND IMAMATE 18691954
31
THE BROKEN RULE OF SAYYID SAID BIN TAYMUR
35
THE MODERN OMANI STATE
37
BORDER DISPUTES ON THE ARABIAN PENINSULA
39
THE QUESTION OF OMAN AT THE UNITED NATIONS
44
TO RULE AND TO GOVERN
47
THE MAJLIS ALS11URA
53
TRENDS IN OMANI DIPLOMACY
55
THE ARABIAN PENINSULA AND THE GULF REGION
65
THE ARAB GULF MONARCHIES
66
The United Arab Emirates
76
Bahrain Kuwait and Qatar
82
GULF SECURITY AND GULF COOPERATION
85
FROM IDEOLOGICAL FOE TO STRATEGIC ALLY
92
The Republic of Yemen
94
REVOLUTIONARY IRAN
99
Common Security Perceptions
101
Relations with the Khumayni Government
102
REVOLUTIONARY IRAQ
108
Oman and the IranIraq War
110
Oman and the War for Kuwait
112
FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES
113
Security Cooperation
115
Economic Cooperation
118
OMAN AND THE WEST
121
THE UNITED KINGDOM
123
The 10 March 1862 Declaration Between France and Britain
125
The AngloFrench Dispute
126
The 1951 and 1958 Treaties
128
Britain and Oman in the I960s
129
Britain and the Question of Oman
131
Britain and Sultan Qaboos
132
FRANCE
134
The First Contacts
135
Renewed Contacts
137
THE UNITED STATES
139
17901850
140
18701910
142
19111970
143
19701980
144
The 1980 Facilities Access Agreement
147
The Critical 1980s
150
19901991
157
Trends
158
RUSSIA CENTRAL ASIA AND THE CAUCASUS
159
Oman and the Tsarist Empire
160
The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
161
The USSR and the Dhufar Rebellion
162
The Soviet Union and Sultan Qaboos
165
Oman Appraises the Soviet Threat
167
Diplomatic Relations with the USSR
168
China and the Dhufar War
188
Political Relations After the Uhufar War
190
Political Relations After the IranIraq War
195
Trade and Cultural Issues
197
THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA TAIWAN
198
INDONESIA
199
MALAYSIA
200
THAILAND
202
VIETNAM
203
AUSTRALIA
205
JAPAN
207
Relations During the Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait
209
OMAN AND SOUTH ASIA
213
Historical Tics
214
Political lies Since 1970
219
The Indian Expatriate Community
222
Trends in OmaniIndian Relations
225
PAKISTAN
226
Political Ties Since 1970
230
The Pakistani Expatriate Community
235
Bilateral Relations
236
Trends in OmaniPaklstani Relations
237
OMAN AND AFRICA
239
Contacts with the West
241
The Sultanate Divided
242
THE PROMISE OF THE FUTURE
244
Somalia
246
TRENDS IN OMANI FOREIGN POLICY
249
THE EFFECTS OF THE WAR FOR KUWAIT
251
AN INDEPENDENT LEGACY
252
BOLD INITIATIVES
253
DOMESTIC POISE
255
QABOOS AND THE IDEA OF OMAN
257
INTERVIEWS
259
CHRONOLOGY
263
THE 1920 TREATY OF SEEB
273
STATEMENT BY SULTAN QABOOS BIN SAVID BROADCAST TO THE PEOPLE OF OMAN27 JULY 1970
277
AGREEMENT CONCERNING DELIMITATION OF THE CONTINENTAL SHELF BETWEEN IRAN AND OMAN
279
INTERNATIONAL BORDER AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA AND THE SULTANATE OF OMAN
283
INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SULTANATE OF OMAN AND THE REPUBLIC OF YEMEN
299
COUNTRIES WITH WHICH OMAN I1AS DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS
319
MEMBERS OF THE MAJLIS ALSHURA 1 DECEMBER 199430 NOVEMBER 1997
323
SPEECH BY HIS MAJESTY SULTAN QABOOS BIN SAID AL BU SAND ON THE OCCASION OF THE OPENING OF THE SECOND TERM OE ...
327
MEETINGS OF HEADS OF STATE WITH SULTAN QABOOS 19701994
331
NATIONAL DAY SPEECH BY HIS MAJESTY SULTAN QABOOS BIN SAID ON 14TH JUMADA AL AKHAR 1415 A H 18TII NOVEMBER 1994
337
Appendix M LETTER OF ACCESSION OF SAID BIN TAYMUR 1932
343
Appendix N STATISTICAL CHARTS
345
BIBLIOGRAPHY
355
INDEX
401
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
409
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information