How to Read Chinese Paintings

Front Cover
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2008 - Painting - 173 pages
1 Review
Maxwell K. Hearn's text discusses each work in depth, considering multiple layers of meaning. Style, technique, symbolism, past traditions, historical events, and the artist's personal circumstances all come into play. Spanning more than a thousand years, from the eighth through the seventeenth century, the subjects represented are particularly wide-ranging: landscapes, flowers, birds, figures, religious subjects, and calligraphies. All illuminate the main goal of every Chinese artist: to capture not only the outer appearance of a subject but also its inner essence. Numerous large color details, accompanied by informative captions, allow the reader to delve further into the most significant aspects of each work.
 

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User Review  - phoenixcomet - LibraryThing

Originally I simply wanted to look at the various Chinese paintings. I was so captivated by the beauty of the artwork that I started to read about what the painting actually represented and the political and social representations of the art. Really enjoyed the book. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Portraying Talent
10
The Vastness and Multiplicity
20
Landscape of Emotion
28
Magic Realism
34
Expressive Freedom in Banishment
48
Envisioning Introspection
58
Dream Vision
64
Identification with Nature
70
Painting as Calligraphy
78
Notes
170
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Maxwell K. Hearn is Douglas Dillon Curator and Shiyee Liu is Research Associate, both in the Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Wen C. Fong is Professor Emeritus, Princeton University, and Curator Emeritus, Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Chin-Sung Chang is Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Art History, Seoul National University.

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